Do you speak American? : a companion to the PBS television series / Robert MacNeil and William Cran.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st ed. in the United States of America
    • Notes:
      Sequel to: The story of English.
      Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index.
    • Other Titles:
      Do you speak American? (Television series)
    • ISBN:
      0385511981
    • Accession Number:
      2004053735
    • Accession Number:
      fay.170632
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MACNEIL, R.; CRAN, W.; MCCRUM, R. Do you speak American? : a companion to the PBS television series. 1st ed. in the United States of America. [s. l.]: Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, 2005. ISBN 0385511981. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.170632. Acesso em: 29 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      MacNeil R, Cran W, McCrum R. Do You Speak American? : A Companion to the PBS Television Series. 1st ed. in the United States of America. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday; 2005. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.170632
    • APA:
      MacNeil, R., Cran, W., & McCrum, R. (2005). Do you speak American? : a companion to the PBS television series (1st ed. in the United States of America). Nan A. Talese/Doubleday.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      MacNeil, Robert, William Cran, and Robert McCrum. 2005. Do You Speak American? : A Companion to the PBS Television Series. 1st ed. in the United States of America. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.170632.
    • Harvard:
      MacNeil, R., Cran, W. and McCrum, R. (2005) Do you speak American? : a companion to the PBS television series. 1st ed. in the United States of America. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.170632 (Accessed: 29 November 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      MacNeil, R, Cran, W & McCrum, R 2005, Do you speak American? : a companion to the PBS television series, 1st ed. in the United States of America, Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, viewed 29 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      MacNeil, Robert, et al. Do You Speak American? : A Companion to the PBS Television Series. 1st ed. in the United States of America, Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, 2005. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.170632.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      MacNeil, Robert, William Cran, and Robert McCrum. Do You Speak American? : A Companion to the PBS Television Series. 1st ed. in the United States of America. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, 2005. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.170632.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      MacNeil R, Cran W, McCrum R. Do you speak American? : a companion to the PBS television series [Internet]. 1st ed. in the United States of America. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday; 2005 [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.170632

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2004 December #1

This is a companion volume to a PBS television series of the same name as well as a sequel to The Story of English (1986), also made into a television series. The authors deliver a surprisingly lively and compelling exploration of American English. Whether talking to crab fishermen in Maryland or country-and-western singers in Tennessee, the authors discover that regional dialects are thriving despite the uniformity of our national tastes in clothing, fast-food chains, and movies. Challenging language elitists, such as critic John Simon, who think grammatical standards are disappearing and that television and radio are homogenizing our speech, the authors show how mobility, immigration, and racial and ethnic mixing are rapidly and profoundly changing the language. One prediction: such diversity in our language may produce more tolerance and appreciation of American speech and less stereotyping. Expressive quotes are often used to make key points; the title comes from a comment by Bono, lead singer of U2, after being fined by the FCC for swearing. This is colorful, witty, and insightful commentary on American speech patterns. ((Reviewed December 1, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2004 September #1

The coauthors (with Robert McCrum) of The Story of English on the story of American English. Companion to a PBS series. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.