Behind you / Jacqueline Woodson.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
  Processing Request
Share on Goodreads
  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: After fifteen-year-old Jeremiah is mistakenly shot by police, the people who love him struggle to cope with their loss as they recall his life and death, unaware that 'Miah is watching over them.
    • ISBN:
      039923988X
    • Accession Number:
      2003023179
    • Accession Number:
      fay.174705
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      WOODSON, J. Behind you. [s.l.] : G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2004. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 21 out. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Woodson J. Behind You. G.P. Putnam’s Sons; 2004. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.174705. Accessed October 21, 2019.
    • APA:
      Woodson, J. (2004). Behind you. G.P. Putnam’s Sons. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.174705
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Woodson, Jacqueline. 2004. Behind You. G.P. Putnam’s Sons. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.174705.
    • Harvard:
      Woodson, J. (2004) Behind you. G.P. Putnam’s Sons. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.174705 (Accessed: 21 October 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Woodson, J 2004, Behind you, G.P. Putnam’s Sons, viewed 21 October 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Woodson, Jacqueline. Behind You. G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2004. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.174705.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Woodson, Jacqueline. Behind You. G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2004. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.174705.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Woodson J. Behind you [Internet]. G.P. Putnam’s Sons; 2004 [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.174705

Reviews

Booklist Monthly Selections - #2 February 2004

Gr. 7-12. "Even if you turn your back on the world you left, you're still pulled toward it, you're still turning around--always--to look behind you. To make sure everyone's o.k.," says teenage Jeremiah, who first appeared in Woodson's If You Come Softly (1998). In this moving sequel, Jeremiah is dead, killed by New York City police bullets. Like the main character in Gary Soto's Afterlife (2003), Jeremiah watches over the people he has left behind--his girlfriend, Ellie; his friends; his divorced parents--as each struggles through grief and tries to "keep doing what the living do," ultimately finding new connections with one another and themselves. Softly alternates between Jeremiah and Ellie's voices. Here Woodson includes the first-person perspectives of several other characters, and with so many different voices, the narrative becomes crowded, diluting each character's story. Still, Woodson writes with impressive poetry about race, love, death, and what grief feels like--the things that "snap the heart"--and her characters' open strength and wary optimism will resonate with many teens. ((Reviewed February 15, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2004 Fall

Black teen Miah was tragically killed at the end of [cf2]If You Come Softly[cf1]; with this sequel, it's as if Woodson couldn't bear to leave her characters without seeing them through the aftermath. Not ready to let go, Miah keeps tabs on the living; in the end, as his family and friends comfort one another, Miah is there watching, whispering in the wind that they are loved. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2004 #3

"When you die, you turn away from the world you've always known and begin the long, slow walk into the next place. And behind you--everyone you left is taking a step deeper into their new world. The world they're learning to live in without you." That's Miah (short for Jeremiah) talking, the black teen shockingly killed by police in a case of mistaken identity at the end of Woodson's If You Come Softly. With this sequel, it's as if Woodson couldn't bear to leave her characters without seeing them through the tragedy's aftermath. The chapters alternate perspectives, allowing readers to hear the voices of Miah and others introduced in the first novel--Miah's girlfriend Ellie, his parents, two friends, and a grandmother who died years before he did. Woodson's concept of the afterlife compares to that in Alice Sebold's The Lovely Bones, in which the recently dead keep tabs on the living because they aren't ready to let go of life on earth. The text is strewn with poignant emblems of the narrators' grief, such as the newspapers in blue bags piling up outside Miah's mother's door like "a blue sunflower, growing out of control." As she did with Miah and Ellie's interracial romance in If You Come Softly, Woodson deftly uses her story as an opportunity for social commentary: Miah's friend and basketball teammate Kennedy is tired of being told by everyone at his elite prep school that he reminds them of Miah just because he's black; Miah's friend Carlton tells Ellie he's gay--the first time he's ever admitted it aloud to anyone. In the end, as his family and friends turn to one another for comfort, Miah is there watching, whispering in the wind that they are loved. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Magazine Reviews