For the love of a dog : understanding emotions in you and your best friend / by Patricia B. McConnell.

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  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MCCONNELL, P. B. For the love of a dog : understanding emotions in you and your best friend. [s. l.]: Ballantine, 2006. ISBN 0345477146. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.209230. Acesso em: 5 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      McConnell PB. For the Love of a Dog : Understanding Emotions in You and Your Best Friend. Ballantine; 2006. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.209230. Accessed July 5, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      McConnell PB. For the Love of a Dog : Understanding Emotions in You and Your Best Friend. Ballantine; 2006. Accessed July 5, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.209230
    • APA:
      McConnell, P. B. (2006). For the love of a dog : understanding emotions in you and your best friend. Ballantine.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      McConnell, Patricia B. 2006. For the Love of a Dog : Understanding Emotions in You and Your Best Friend. Ballantine. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.209230.
    • Harvard:
      McConnell, P. B. (2006) For the love of a dog : understanding emotions in you and your best friend. Ballantine. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.209230 (Accessed: 5 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      McConnell, PB 2006, For the love of a dog : understanding emotions in you and your best friend, Ballantine, viewed 5 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      McConnell, Patricia B. For the Love of a Dog : Understanding Emotions in You and Your Best Friend. Ballantine, 2006. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.209230.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      McConnell, Patricia B. For the Love of a Dog : Understanding Emotions in You and Your Best Friend. Ballantine, 2006. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.209230.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      McConnell PB. For the love of a dog : understanding emotions in you and your best friend [Internet]. Ballantine; 2006 [cited 2020 Jul 5]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.209230

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2006 August #1

Understanding what drives the behavior of our pet dogs is McConnell's goal. She teaches readers to understand the emotional environment of their dogs' actions and helps them to reprogram undesirable behaviors. This is not a book on how to train dogs, but McConnell's examination of cases from her veterinary practice, backed up by her scientific study of animal behavior, will help readers better understand their closest companions. Whether discussing separation anxiety, fear biting, or simple canine happiness, McConnell explains the emotional state of each dog and how this drives the observed behavior. One gentle Labrador was traumatized by an aggressive boy and had begun to growl and snap at all human males--he was cured by simple therapy involving habituation to nice behavior and treats from men and boys. A dog that was terrified of thunder was trained to go to his safe place--a heavily insulated, very quiet doghouse. McConnell's main message is for readers to observe their own dogs and to understand the emotions behind their actions, both good and bad. ((Reviewed August 2006)) Copyright 2006 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2006 April #1

Do dogs have emotions? Does my dog love me? Dog owners everywhere who get up before 6 a.m. to give their pups outdoor time would say yes, but zoology professor McConnell (The Other End of the Leash) goes further, discussing the similarities and differences between canine and human brains. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

LJ Reviews 2006 September #1

In her Ph.D. dissertation, animal behaviorist McConnell (zoology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison; Puppy Primer ) discussed the possibility that acoustic signals can be used to influence the response of receivers to the sender's advantage. Her scientific research provided a solid foundation for her considerations of everyday interactions between animals and their humans. Her book focuses on the signals that humans can read (talking eyebrows, wrinkles, body shape, tongue flicks) in order to understand their dog's internal state. She also includes information on the relationship between the brain and how the dog reacts to its environment, incorporating the genetics of fear, the biology of anger, the programming that early development implements, and the effect that learning and experience have on the dog's response to stimuli. Using vignette examples of human-canine interactions, McConnell offers sophisticated explanations to account for different types of behavior, as well as insight into how bad behavior can be prevented. Extensive resource lists for each chapter include pictures of the facial expressions and postures discussed. Highly recommended for all public libraries, especially those subscribing to DogFancy Magazine , and academic libraries with zoology departments. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 4/1/06.] Cleo Pappas, Lib. of the Health Sciences, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

[Page 167]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

PW Reviews 2006 June #2

Animal behaviorist, dog trainer, syndicated radio talk show host and prolific author on all things canine, McConnell (The Other End of the Leash ) presents a compelling combination of stories, science and practical advice to show how understanding emotions in both people and dogs can improve owners' relationships with their pets. This is more than a simple dog-training book: much of what McConnell discusses concerns how dog owners can learn "the language" of dog by recognizing important signals and reading them correctly. She provides numerous helpful examples of how owners can observe dog behavior, especially differences in posture and facial expressions, in order to help dogs be better behaved and help dog owners to be better handlers; her discussion of the meaning of a dog's "tongue flicks" is alone worth the price of the book. Her overall goal is to help owners provide their pets with "a sense of calm, peaceful benevolence," and she skewers current dog-training fads that emphasize "dominance" over a dog. "Don't fool yourself: if you yell at your dog for something he did twenty seconds ago, you're not training him; you're merely expressing your own anger." (On sale Aug. 15)

[Page 45]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.