Typhoid Mary : an urban historical / by Anthony Bourdain.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st U.S. ed.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Recounts the story of Mary Mallon, an immigrant cook considered responsible for the 1904 outbreak of typhoid fever in Oyster Bay, Long Island, and describes her attempts to escape capture and institutionalization.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (p. 145-148).
    • ISBN:
      9781582341330 : HRD
      1582341338 : HRD
    • Accession Number:
      2001018444
    • Accession Number:
      fay.228467
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BOURDAIN, A. Typhoid Mary : an urban historical. [s. l.]: Bloomsbury, 2001. ISBN 9781582341330. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.228467. Acesso em: 22 jan. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Bourdain A. Typhoid Mary : An Urban Historical. Bloomsbury; 2001. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.228467. Accessed January 22, 2020.
    • APA:
      Bourdain, A. (2001). Typhoid Mary : an urban historical. Bloomsbury. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.228467
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Bourdain, Anthony. 2001. Typhoid Mary : An Urban Historical. Bloomsbury. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.228467.
    • Harvard:
      Bourdain, A. (2001) Typhoid Mary : an urban historical. Bloomsbury. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.228467 (Accessed: 22 January 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Bourdain, A 2001, Typhoid Mary : an urban historical, Bloomsbury, viewed 22 January 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Bourdain, Anthony. Typhoid Mary : An Urban Historical. Bloomsbury, 2001. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.228467.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Bourdain, Anthony. Typhoid Mary : An Urban Historical. Bloomsbury, 2001. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.228467.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Bourdain A. Typhoid Mary : an urban historical [Internet]. Bloomsbury; 2001 [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.228467

Reviews

Booklist Monthly Selections - #2 April 2001

In Typhoid Mary , Bourdain, renowned chef and author of Kitchen Confidential (2000), reexamines the legend of Mary Maflon, otherwise known as the infamous Typhoid Mary. Unwittingly responsible for an outbreak of typhoid fever in Oyster Bay, Long Island, in 1904, Mary, a cook, fled when authorities began to suspect that she was a carrier. Resurfacing in New York City, she continued to infect victims with the typhoid bacillus until she was caught and incarcerated by the authorities. Investing a tragic tale with a new twist, Bourdain plays historical detective, providing an entertaining and suspenseful evocation of turn-of-the-century New York. ((Reviewed April 15, 2001)) Copyright 2001 Booklist Reviews

LJ Reviews 2001 April #1

Bloomsbury launches its "Urban Historicals" series with a pair of books on both New York's most infamous cook and what (if true) would have been the city's greatest hoax. Bourdain, the chef and author of last year's cheeky Kitchen Confidential, attempts to retell the story of Mary Mallon from a cook's perspective. Early in the last century, the Irish immigrant Mallon became notorious as "Typhoid Mary" and was imprisoned by health authorities on an island in the East River after (unwittingly or not) spreading typhoid to 33 victims, with three confirmed deaths. Like Lizzie Borden, Mallon has received various writers' interpretations, the last in a 1996 biography by Judith Leavitt of the same title (LJ 5/15/96) that told the tale with more health science and a less cranky style. Bourdain chooses to light the story's shadows by relating to her as a once-proud, broken-down cook, interpreting Mallon's infecting spree with a kitchen-hardened aplomb and New York attitude. Chapter titles tend toward the snarky and hip ("There's Something About Mary," "Typhoid sucks"), and only a New York guy would describe bacteria settling into a gall bladder "like rent-controlled pensioners." Yet when, at the work's end, Bourdain makes a cook-to-cook offering at Mary's grave, it somehow feels more moving than stagey. Rose, a novelist and founder of the 1980s literary magazine Between C&D, has created "an entertainment, a reimagining of a piece of the past that may well have been imagined in the first place." His light-handed telling concerns a possible hoax from about 1824, when a butcher and a carpenter in New York's old Centre Market purportedly discussed their plan to solve overbuilt Manhattan's dangerous bottom-heaviness by sawing it in half, turning the top part of the island around, and reattaching it at the Battery. Word spread, and the enormous project seized the imaginations of Manhattan's poor, who showed up by the hundreds with saws and shovels, while merchants set aside enormous stores of food for the expected work crews. So, at least, claimed one of the hoaxers years later in a conversation with his amateur-historian nephew. Instead of being the "Crop Circles" phenomenon of its day, however, there seems no reason to believe the sawing scam was put over on anyone beyond the credulous nephew who first recorded it; Rose is quite aware of this and puts this re-embroidered lore into entertaining context, along the way creating a charming, atmospheric portrait of old New York. He also notes some classic period cons (the 161-year-old slave who nursed George Washington; the embalmed mermaid) perpetrated by the era's proven master humbuggers. Nathan Ward, "Library Journal" Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.