Animals make us human : creating the best life for animals / Temple Grandin & Catherine Johnson.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Drawing on the latest scientific research and her own work with animals, the author discusses the emotional needs of animals and how to fulfill them, challenging common myths about animal emotions, mental stimulation, and emotional well-being.
    • ISBN:
      9780151014897 : HRD
      0151014892 : HRD
    • Accession Number:
      2008034892
    • Accession Number:
      fay.266657
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      GRANDIN, T.; JOHNSON, C. Animals make us human : creating the best life for animals. [s.l.] : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 18 nov. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Grandin T, Johnson C. Animals Make Us Human : Creating the Best Life for Animals. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 2009. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.266657. Accessed November 18, 2019.
    • APA:
      Grandin, T., & Johnson, C. (2009). Animals make us human : creating the best life for animals. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.266657
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Grandin, Temple, and Catherine Johnson. 2009. Animals Make Us Human : Creating the Best Life for Animals. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.266657.
    • Harvard:
      Grandin, T. and Johnson, C. (2009) Animals make us human : creating the best life for animals. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.266657 (Accessed: 18 November 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Grandin, T & Johnson, C 2009, Animals make us human : creating the best life for animals, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, viewed 18 November 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Grandin, Temple, and Catherine Johnson. Animals Make Us Human : Creating the Best Life for Animals. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.266657.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Grandin, Temple, and Catherine Johnson. Animals Make Us Human : Creating the Best Life for Animals. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.266657.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Grandin T, Johnson C. Animals make us human : creating the best life for animals [Internet]. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 2009 [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.266657

Reviews

LJ Reviews 2008 September #2

A famed animal scientist who draws on her autism to help understand her charges helps us understand animal emotion. With a 13-city tour. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

LJ Reviews 2008 October #2

The coauthors of best-selling Animals in Translation have teamed up again to investigate four basic driving forces behind behaviors in dogs, cats, horses, cows, pigs, poultry, wildlife, and zoo animals. They discuss how humans must understand these drives in order to provide a "good mental life" for their animals. It's best to read the book cover to cover in order to understand the continuity that takes place between the chapters and the comparisons of behaviors exhibited by each species. The text provides thought-provoking scenarios and references several animal studies, but, unfortunately, there is a definite sense of uncompromising bias in favor of the authors' ideas, mitigating any sort of objective study or research that differs from their own conclusions. Those who work with animals will balk at some of the discussions as it's possible to find examples in which what the authors write isn't necessarily the case. For example, the authors note that horses, unlike dogs, can get too excited and worked up over food treats to stay focused on their training. But as many pet owners can testify, dogs can get overly distracted over a food treat. Still, readers will be able to glean new perspectives about animal welfare. Grandin (animal science, Colorado State Univ.) is a renowned autistic author of several books on autism and animal behavior, and writer Johnson specializes in neuropsychiatry and the brain. Recommended for libraries with animal behavior and animal welfare collections. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 9/15/08.]—Kyrille Goldbeck, Virginia Polytechnic & State Inst. Libs., Blacksburg

[Page 91]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

PW Reviews 2008 October #2

Grandin (Animals in Translation ), famed for her decades-long commitment to treating livestock as humanely as possible on its way to slaughter, considers how humans and animals can best interact. Working from the premise that "an animal is a conscious being that has feelings," the autistic author assesses dogs, cats, horses, cows, pigs, poultry, wildlife and zoo animals based on a "core emotion system" she believes animals and humans share, including a need to seek; a sense of rage, fear, and panic; feelings of lust; an urge to nurture; and an ability to play. Among observations at odds with conventional wisdom: dogs need human parents, not alpha pack leaders, and cats respond to training. Discussions of why horses are skittish and why pigs are arguably the most intelligent of beasts—raccoons run them a close second—illuminate the intersection of people and more domesticated animals; chapters on cows and chickens focus more generally on animal welfare, particularly the horrific conditions in which they are usually raised and slaughtered. Packed with fascinating insights, unexpected observations and a wealth of how-to tips, Grandin's peppy work ably challenges assumptions about what makes animals happy. (Jan.)

[Page 46]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.