They cleared the lane : the NBA's Black pioneers / Ron Thomas.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Today, black players compose more than eighty percent of the National Basketball Association's rosters, providing a strong and valued contribution to professional basketball. In the first half of the twentieth century, however, pro basketball was tainted by racism, as gifted African Americans were denied the opportunity to display their talents. Through in-depth interviews with players, their families, coaches, teammates, and league officials, Ron Thomas tells the largely untold story of what basketball was really like for the first black NBA players, including recent Hall of Fame inductee Earl Lloyd, early superstars such as Maurice Stokes and Bill Russell, and the league's first black coaches. They Cleared the Lane is both informative and entertaining, full of anecdotes and little-known history. Not all the stories have happy endings, but this unfortunate truth only emphasizes how much we have gained from the accomplishments of these pioneer athletes.--Publisher's description.
    • Content Notes:
      One step at a time -- Jackie's legacy -- Just a dab of color -- A taste of Sweetwater -- "No" to the Trotters, "yes" to the NBA -- Frustrated pioneer -- Moon fixer rises -- West Virginia state spawned the pioneers -- The gentlest giant -- Barksdale, a man of many firsts -- Barksdale's long haul to the all-star game -- Teammates' jealousy kills Cleo Hill's career -- Eastern league provides haven for NBA rejects -- John McLendon, Naismith's protégé -- The coming of the superstars -- Black coaches extend integration beyond the sidelines -- Today's NBA.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (p. [257]-262) and index.
    • Other Titles:
      NBA's Black pioneers.
    • ISBN:
      0803244371 (cloth : alk. paper)
      9780803244375 (cloth : alk. paper)
    • Accession Number:
      2001052234
    • Accession Number:
      ocm48074285
      48074285
    • Accession Number:
      fay.307710
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      THOMAS, R. They cleared the lane : the NBA’s Black pioneers. [s.l.] : University of Nebraska Press, 2002. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 13 out. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Thomas R. They Cleared the Lane : The NBA’s Black Pioneers. University of Nebraska Press; 2002. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.307710. Accessed October 13, 2019.
    • APA:
      Thomas, R. (2002). They cleared the lane : the NBA’s Black pioneers. University of Nebraska Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.307710
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Thomas, Ron. 2002. They Cleared the Lane : The NBA’s Black Pioneers. University of Nebraska Press. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.307710.
    • Harvard:
      Thomas, R. (2002) They cleared the lane : the NBA’s Black pioneers. University of Nebraska Press. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.307710 (Accessed: 13 October 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Thomas, R 2002, They cleared the lane : the NBA’s Black pioneers, University of Nebraska Press, viewed 13 October 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Thomas, Ron. They Cleared the Lane : The NBA’s Black Pioneers. University of Nebraska Press, 2002. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.307710.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Thomas, Ron. They Cleared the Lane : The NBA’s Black Pioneers. University of Nebraska Press, 2002. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.307710.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Thomas R. They cleared the lane : the NBA’s Black pioneers [Internet]. University of Nebraska Press; 2002 [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.307710

Reviews

Booklist Monthly Selections - #2 March 2002

The current racial mix of the NBA is about 90 percent black and 10 percent white. Blacks hold a large percentage of the coaching positions, and there are black general managers and part owners. No one thinks much about it anymore, but that wasn't always the case. Thomas, a San Francisco Chronicle sportswriter, presents an overview of the NBA's first black players, the social and racial barriers they encountered, and the gradual progress they made. Among those profiled are Nat "Sweetwater" Clifton, Chuck Cooper, and Don Barksdale, the league's first black All-Star. Though the earliest black players were primarily rebounding and defensive specialists, it wasn't long before the first generations of superstars arrived: Russell, Chamberlain, Robertson, and Baylor. Most long-term NBA fans are aware of the NBA's role at the forefront of sports integration, but Thomas places a very human face on it and points out that there were sacrifices made and risks taken to bring the league to its current position as the world's top professional sports attraction. ((Reviewed March 15, 2002)) Copyright 2002 Booklist Reviews

LJ Reviews 2002 April #1

Probably one of the best books available about professional basketball and the NBA, this book about the first black players in the NBA will hold every reader's interest as it tells a compelling story. Although the current NBA is over 80 percent black, African Americans did not enter the league until 1950, basketball being the last of the major sports to integrate. Yet even the most dedicated NBA fan would be hard-pressed to identify such pioneers as Harold Hunter, Earl Lloyd, and Chuck Cooper: Hunter was the first black player to sign an NBA contract, Cooper was the first to be drafted by an NBA team, and Lloyd was the first black to play in an NBA game. The book describes their trials and triumphs and then more briefly traces the rise of the black athlete as a force in the league. It was not easy, as there were official and unofficial "quotas," and traveling with the teams was an ordeal. This is a book of real importance, not just for basketball fans but for those who want to know about the role African Americans played in the development of the NBA and big-time sports today. Highly recommended for all libraries. William Scheeren, Hempfield Area H.S. Lib., Greensburg, PA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

LJ Reviews 2002 May #1

Thomas's is probably one of the two or three best books about professional basketball ever read by this reviewer. The compelling narrative will hold every reader's interest. Although the current National Basketball Association (NBA) is over 80 percent black, African Americans did not enter the league until 1950. Yet even the most dedicated NBA fan would be hard-pressed to identify such pioneers as Harold Hunter (the first black player to sign an NBA contract), Earl Lloyd (the first black to play in an NBA game), and Chuck Cooper (the first to be drafted by an NBA team). The book describes their trials and triumphs and then more briefly traces the rise of the black athlete as a force in the league. It was not easy, as there were official and unofficial "quotas," and local harassment could make traveling with the teams a real ordeal. This book is important not just for basketball fans but for those who want to understand the role played by African Americans in the development of the NBA and big-time sports today. Highly recommended. William Scheeren, Hempfield Area H.S. Lib., Greensburg, PA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.