The story of Earth : the first 4.5 billion years, from stardust to living planet / Robert M. Hazen.

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  • Author(s): Hazen, Robert M., 1948-
  • Language:
    English
  • Publication Information:
    New York : Viking, 2012.
  • Publication Date:
    2012
  • Physical Description:
    306 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Publication Type:
    Book
  • Document Type:
    Non-fiction
  • Subject Terms:
  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: In this radical new approach to Earth's biography, senior Carnegie Institution researcher and national bestselling author Robert M. Hazen reveals how the co-evolution of the geosphere and biosphere--of rocks and living matter--has shaped our planet into the only one of its kind in the Solar System, if not the entire cosmos.
    • Content Notes:
      Birth : the formation of Earth -- The Big Thwack : the formation of the moon -- Black Earth : the first basalt crust -- Blue Earth : the formation of the oceans -- Gray Earth : the first granite crust -- Living Earth : the origins of life -- Red Earth : photosynthesis and the Great Oxidation Event -- The "boring" billion : the mineral revolution -- White Earth : the snowball-hothouse cycle -- Green Earth : the rise of the terrestrial biosphere -- The future : scenarios of a changing planet.
    • Notes:
      Includes index.
    • ISBN:
      9780670023554
      0670023558
    • Accession Number:
      2011043713
    • Accession Number:
      ocn758973664
      758973664
    • Accession Number:
      fay.352955
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      HAZEN, R. M. The story of Earth : the first 4.5 billion years, from stardust to living planet. [s.l.] : Viking, 2012. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15 jun. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Hazen RM. The Story of Earth : The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet. Viking; 2012. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.352955. Accessed June 15, 2019.
    • APA:
      Hazen, R. M. (2012). The story of Earth : the first 4.5 billion years, from stardust to living planet. Viking. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.352955
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Hazen, Robert M. 2012. The Story of Earth : The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet. Viking. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.352955.
    • Harvard:
      Hazen, R. M. (2012) The story of Earth : the first 4.5 billion years, from stardust to living planet. Viking. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.352955 (Accessed: 15 June 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Hazen, RM 2012, The story of Earth : the first 4.5 billion years, from stardust to living planet, Viking, viewed 15 June 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Hazen, Robert M. The Story of Earth : The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet. Viking, 2012. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.352955.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Hazen, Robert M. The Story of Earth : The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet. Viking, 2012. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.352955.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Hazen RM. The story of Earth : the first 4.5 billion years, from stardust to living planet [Internet]. Viking; 2012 [cited 2019 Jun 15]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.352955

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2012 April #2

As an earth-sciences professor at George Mason University and the author of several previous popular-science books, including (with coauthor James Trefil) the best-selling Science Matters (2009), Hazen is the perfect candidate to pen this exceptionally readable layperson's guide to the earth's geological and biological history. Setting aside the usual geologic-era names such as Precambrian or Paleozoic, Hazen instead gives these periods more user-friendly labels like The Big Thwack, covering the moon's formation, and The Boring Billion, covering a span when terrestrial changes were relatively static. In describing the broad sweep of mineralogical and chemical alterations the earth underwent, from the appearance of the oceans to the emergence of primitive cellular life, Hazen demonstrates how minerals and living creatures have evolved together. This coevolution of life and rocks scenario represents a recent paradigm shift in geological science that, Hazen argues, merits closer study as the planet bears the brunt of human-caused climate change. Science junkies and readers interested in the environment will find Hazen's arguments compelling and his overview of earth's tumultuous history captivating. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2012 April #1

Hazen (senior research scientist, Carnegie Inst.; earth science, George Mason Univ.; Genesis: The Scientific Quest for Life's Origin) here describes mineral evolution—a sequence of mineral formation common to terrestrial planets. In later stages of this sequence, living organisms contribute to the formation of novel crystalline substances, while minerals make possible the evolution of new life forms; for example, Earth's first photosynthetic bacteria released oxygen into their watery surroundings and the atmosphere above, making possible new chemical reactions that produced a variety of oxygen-rich minerals. Some new minerals, in turn, provided sources of chemical energy that new life forms could exploit. Hazen is confident that life and minerals will continue to interact for millions of years, but he cautions that both natural geologic processes and human activity will probably jeopardize the survival of our own species. VERDICT While some overlap with the author's previous work is inevitable, this title is considerably more focused on geological history. Hazen has a gift for explaining science in lay terms, and even readers with a minimal understanding of geology, chemistry, and physics will find this book riveting.—Nancy R. Curtis, Univ. of Maine Lib., Orono

[Page 94]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PW Reviews 2012 February #1

With a blend of storytelling and science (from mineralogy and geology to biochemistry), Hazen (Science Matters) illuminates the origins of Earth and the origins of life. Hazen begins some 4.5 billion years ago, when the solar system coalesced from a cloud of cosmic debris. Hazen, a professor of earth science at George Mason University, describes the "Big Thwack" from a wandering asteroid that knocked off a piece of molten Earth to make the Moon. The creation of oceans and continents fed by Earth's "inner heat"; a celebrated 1953 experiment to recreate the Earth's "primordial soup"; and the discovery of strange creatures living on volcanic vents deep underwater show that life probably began in the water. Hazen moves on to photosynthetic organisms and their impact on the atmosphere, and on the explosive growth of algae in shallow coastal waters. Fossils show that the first primitive animal life evolved at least 545 million years ago and endured despite the threats of natural disaster, mass extinctions, and the extreme cold of the Ice Ages. Hazen enriches his story with details about pioneering researchers like continental drift theorist Alfred Wegener, and his own experiences hunting for meteorites, handling moon rocks, and collecting trilobytes. This is a thoroughly accessible book, deftly mixing a variety of scientific disciplines to tell an unforgettable story. Agent: Eric Lupfer, William Morris Enterprises. (Apr.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC