Inside out & back again/ Thanhha Lai.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Through a series of poems, a young girl chronicles the life-changing year of 1975, when she, her mother, and her brothers leave Vietnam and resettle in Alabama.
    • Notes:
      Narrated by Doan Ly.
    • Notes:
      Unabridged.
      Compact discs.
      Ages 8-12.
    • Other Titles:
      Inside out and back again.
    • ISBN:
      9780061962783 (book)
      0061962783 (book)
      9781464020919 (set)
      1464020914 (set)
      9781464020889
      1464020884
    • Accession Number:
      ocn776167461
      776167461
    • Accession Number:
      fay.362565
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      LAI, T.; LY, D. Inside out & back agai. [s.l.] : Recorded Books, 2012. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 19 out. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Lai T, Ly D. Inside out & Back Agai. Recorded Books; 2012. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.362565. Accessed October 19, 2019.
    • APA:
      Lai, T., & Ly, D. (2012). Inside out & back agai. Recorded Books. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.362565
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Lai, Thanhha, and Doan Ly. 2012. Inside out & Back Agai. Recorded Books Sound Reading Solutions. Recorded Books. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.362565.
    • Harvard:
      Lai, T. and Ly, D. (2012) Inside out & back agai. Recorded Books (Recorded Books sound reading solutions). Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.362565 (Accessed: 19 October 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Lai, T & Ly, D 2012, Inside out & back agai, Recorded Books sound reading solutions, Recorded Books, viewed 19 October 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Lai, Thanhha, and Doan Ly. Inside out & Back Agai. Recorded Books, 2012. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.362565.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Lai, Thanhha, and Doan Ly. Inside out & Back Agai. Recorded Books Sound Reading Solutions. Recorded Books, 2012. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.362565.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Lai T, Ly D. Inside out & back agai [Internet]. Recorded Books; 2012 [cited 2019 Oct 19]. (Recorded Books sound reading solutions). Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.362565

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2011 January #1

*Starred Review* After her father has been missing in action for nine years during the Vietnam War, 10-year-old Hà flees with her mother and three older brothers. Traveling first by boat, the family reaches a tent city in Guam, moves on to Florida, and is finally connected with sponsors in Alabama, where Hà finds refuge but also cruel rejection, especially from mean classmates. Based on Lai's personal experience, this first novel captures a child-refugee's struggle with rare honesty. Written in accessible, short free-verse poems, Hà's immediate narrative describes her mistakes—both humorous and heartbreaking—with grammar, customs, and dress (she wears a flannel nightgown to school, for example); and readers will be moved by Hà's sorrow as they recognize the anguish of being the outcast who spends lunchtime hiding in the bathroom. Eventually, Hà does get back at the sneering kids who bully her at school, and she finds help adjusting to her new life from a kind teacher who lost a son in Vietnam. The elemental details of Hà's struggle dramatize a foreigner's experience of alienation. And even as she begins to shape a new life, there is no easy comfort: her father is still gone. Copyright 2011 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2011 Fall

Recounting events that resemble her own family's 1975 flight from Saigon, Lai pens a novel in vividly imagined verse. In Alabama, Ha is daunted by challenges including mastering idiosyncratic English. Many people are cruelly antagonistic, but Ha soon finds allies at school. Spare language captures the sensory disorientation of changing cultures as well as a refugee's complex emotions and kaleidoscopic loyalties. Copyright 2011 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2011 #2

Recounting events that resemble her own family's 1975 flight from Saigon and first months in the United States, Lai pens a novel in vividly imagined verse. Each brief poem encapsulates a mood and experience of that year. As the Vietnam War nears its end in April, ten-year-old Ha's "Birthday Wishes" include "Wish Mother would stop / chiding me to stay calm / which makes it worse" and that "Father [who's missing in action] would come home." Registering for school in Alabama in August, Ha encounters "a woman who / pats my head / while shaking her own. / I step back, / hating pity, /...the pity giver / feels better, / never the pity receiver." Such condescension is new to Ha and her brothers, all excellent students, as is being daunted by challenges like the urgent need to master idiosyncratic English. Meanwhile, Brother Vu takes odd jobs; Quang (who once said, "One cannot justify war / unless each side / flaunts its own / blind conviction") repairs cars. Many neighbors and classmates, with their own blind convictions, are cruelly antagonistic, but Ha soon finds allies at school and in English-tutor Ms. Washington. Lai's spare language captures the sensory disorientation of changing cultures as well as a refugee's complex emotions and kaleidoscopic loyalties. That Ms. Washington's son died in Vietnam underlines the disparity between nations' quarrels and their citizens' humanity, suggesting this as a provocative companion to Katherine Paterson's Park's Quest (rev. 7/88). joanna rudge long Copyright 2011 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

PW Reviews 2011 January #5

Narrating in sparse free-verse poems, 10-year-old Hà brings a strong, memorable voice to the immigrant experience as her family moves from war-torn South Vietnam to Alabama in 1975. First-time author Lai, who made the same journey with her family, divides her novel into four sections set in Vietnam, "At Sea," and the last two in Alabama. Lai gives insight into cultural and physical landscapes, as well as a finely honed portrait of Hà's family as they await word about Hà's POW father and face difficult choices (awaiting a sponsor family, "...Mother learns/ sponsors prefer those/ whose applications say ‘Christians.'/ Just like that/ Mother amends our faith,/ saying all beliefs/ are pretty much the same"). The taut portrayal of Hà's emotional life is especially poignant as she cycles from feeling smart in Vietnam to struggling in the States, and finally regains academic and social confidence. A series of poems about English grammar offer humor and a lens into the difficulties of adjusting to a new language and customs ("Whoever invented English/ should be bitten/ by a snake"). An incisive portrait of human resilience. Ages 8–12. (Mar.)

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