The liberator : one World War II soldier's 500-day odyssey from the beaches of Sicily to the gates of Dachau / Alex Kershaw.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st ed.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: The true story of the bloodiest and most dramatic march to victory of the Second World War. The battlefield odyssey of a maverick U.S. Army officer and his infantry unit as they fought for over five hundred days to liberate Europe; frmo the invasion of Italy to the gates of Dachau.
    • Content Notes:
      Prologue. The graves. -- pt. 1. The dust bowl. The west ; Off to war -- pt. 2. Italy. Sicily ; The race for Messina ; Mountain country -- pt. 3. Anzio. Danger ahead ; Hell broke loose ; A blood dimmed tide ; The battle of the caves ; Crossing the line ; The bitch-head ; The break out ; Rome -- pt. 4. France. Day 401 ; The Champagne campaign ; The Vosges -- pt. 5. Germany. Black December ; The breaking point ; Defeat ; The river ; The Siegfried Line ; Cassino on the Main ; Downfall -- pt. 7. The heart of darkness. The day of the Americans ; The hounds of hell ; The coal yard ; The Linden incident ; The long day closes -- pt. 8. Last battles. The last days ; Victory in Europe ; Peace breaks out ; The last battle.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (p. [413]-428) and index.
    • ISBN:
      9780307887993 (hbk.)
      0307887995 (hbk.)
    • Accession Number:
      2012017064
    • Accession Number:
      ocn793503440
      793503440
    • Accession Number:
      fay.369544
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      KERSHAW, A. The liberator : one World War II soldier’s 500-day odyssey from the beaches of Sicily to the gates of Dachau. 1st ed. [s. l.]: Crown, 2012. ISBN 9780307887993. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.369544. Acesso em: 28 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Kershaw A. The Liberator : One World War II Soldier’s 500-Day Odyssey from the Beaches of Sicily to the Gates of Dachau. 1st ed. Crown; 2012. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.369544. Accessed May 28, 2020.
    • APA:
      Kershaw, A. (2012). The liberator : one World War II soldier’s 500-day odyssey from the beaches of Sicily to the gates of Dachau (1st ed.). Crown.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Kershaw, Alex. 2012. The Liberator : One World War II Soldier’s 500-Day Odyssey from the Beaches of Sicily to the Gates of Dachau. 1st ed. Crown. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.369544.
    • Harvard:
      Kershaw, A. (2012) The liberator : one World War II soldier’s 500-day odyssey from the beaches of Sicily to the gates of Dachau. 1st ed. Crown. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.369544 (Accessed: 28 May 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Kershaw, A 2012, The liberator : one World War II soldier’s 500-day odyssey from the beaches of Sicily to the gates of Dachau, 1st ed., Crown, viewed 28 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Kershaw, Alex. The Liberator : One World War II Soldier’s 500-Day Odyssey from the Beaches of Sicily to the Gates of Dachau. 1st ed., Crown, 2012. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.369544.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Kershaw, Alex. The Liberator : One World War II Soldier’s 500-Day Odyssey from the Beaches of Sicily to the Gates of Dachau. 1st ed. Crown, 2012. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.369544.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Kershaw A. The liberator : one World War II soldier’s 500-day odyssey from the beaches of Sicily to the gates of Dachau [Internet]. 1st ed. Crown; 2012 [cited 2020 May 28]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.369544

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2012 October #2

Kershaw writes for the New York Times and has also written several books on the experiences of American soldiers during WWII. Here he chronicles the saga of the 157th Infantry from July 1943 to the end of the war. At the center of the narrative is Felix Sparks, who, born in Texas and raised in Arizona, enlisted in the army in 1936 and rose to the rank of colonel by the end of the war. He was in the thick of action as he and his regiment fought in Sicily, moved up the Italian coast and into Germany, and liberated the concentration camp at Dachau in Bavaria. Using interviews with Sparks as well as his letters and those of his men, Kershaw tells a grim but also inspiring story. There is little glory here. Rather, it is a tale of death and destruction climaxed by the horror of countless rotting corpses at Dachau, where enraged G.I.'s slaughtered German camp guards until stopped by Sparks. Still, the ability of Sparks and his men to endure and persevere endows them with a degree of nobility. This is a gripping and superbly told account of men in war. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2012 June #2

Actually, that's 511 days of war. Kershaw, well known for his books on World War II, e.g., The Bedford Boys, The Longest Winter, here writes about a standout officer named Felix Sparks and the men he led across Europe, from Sicily to Dachau, fighting every inch of the way.

[Page 50]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ Reviews 2012 October #2

Like many of his generation, Felix Sparks did not seek glory on the battlefield but dutifully accepted the responsibilities of being a soldier. Kershaw (The Longest Winter) details Sparks's service in the 157th Infantry Regiment of the 45th Division of the U.S. Army as he rose from second lieutenant to colonel in the European theater from Sicily to the liberation of German concentration camp Dachau. But Kershaw is not writing a biography so much as a regimental history, although Sparks's legacy deserves fuller attention. After the war, he served Colorado as a state supreme court justice and became a gun-control advocate. Kershaw could have gone on to use the war as a backdrop for how Sparks handled further challenges. VERDICT As historical narratives, Rick Atkinson's The Day of Battle and Michael Hirsch's The Liberators offer better understanding of the Italian campaign and the liberation of the concentration camps, respectively, but general readers may consider this as well.—JS

[Page 89]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ Reviews Newsletter

Like many of his generation, Felix Sparks did not seek glory on the battlefield but dutifully accepted the responsibilities of being a soldier. Kershaw (The Longest Winter) details Sparks's service in the 157th Infantry Regiment of the 45th Division of the U.S. Army as he rose from second lieutenant to colonel in the European theater from Sicily to the liberation of German concentration camp Dachau. But Kershaw is not writing a biography so much as a regimental history, although Sparks's legacy deserves fuller attention. After the war, he served Colorado as a state supreme court justice and became a gun-control advocate. Kershaw could have gone on to use the war as a backdrop for how Sparks handled further challenges. VERDICT As historical narratives, Rick Atkinson's The Day of Battle and Michael Hirsch's The Liberators offer better understanding of the Italian campaign and the liberation of the concentration camps, respectively, but general readers may consider this as well.—JS (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PW Reviews 2012 September #3

In his latest WWII narrative, Kershaw (The Longest Winter) examines the war through the experiences of Felix Sparks, an American law student–turned–soldier who saw action in some of the bloodiest campaigns of 1943–1945. Sparks was initially assigned as a second lieutenant with the 157th Infantry Regiment of the 45th Infantry Division (the so-called "Thunderbirds") and ended his service as a "world-weary" lieutenant colonel. Kershaw follows Sparks and the 157th as they land at Sicily, help liberate Rome, push on through France, and are among the first American troops to enter Germany. "No force in history is thought to have freed so many people and marched so far to do so," Kershaw proclaims. But the darkest moment comes when the soldiers liberate the concentration camp at Dachau, which pushes many of them to the breaking point. While Kershaw's prose can be purplish, he is a captivating narrator, hammering home the chaos and carnage of war, sparing no sensory detail to paint a cohesive picture. Kershaw's portrayal of his subject (based on interviews with Sparks, who died in 2007, and other survivors) makes for a riveting, almost epic tale of a larger-than-life, underappreciated figure. 16 pages of b&w photos, and photos throughout, 13 maps. Agent: Jim Hornfischer, Hornfischer Literary Management. (Oct. 30)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC