A street cat named Bob : and how he saved my life / James Bowen.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First U.S. edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: When street musician James Bowen found an injured cat curled up in the hallway of his apartment building, he had no idea how much his life was about to change. James was living hand to mouth on the streets of London, barely making enough money to feed himself, and the last thing he needed was a pet. Yet James couldn't resist helping the strikingly intelligent but very sick animal, whom he named Bob. He slowly nursed Bob back to health and then sent the cat on his way, imagining that he would never see him again. But Bob had other ideas.
    • Content Notes:
      Fellow Travellers -- Road To Recovery -- The Snip -- Ticket To Ride -- Centre of Attention -- One Man and His Cat -- The Two Musketeers -- Making It Official -- The Escape Artist -- Santa Paws -- Mistaken Identity -- Number 683 -- Pitch Perfect -- Under the Weather -- The Naughty List --Angel Hearts -- Forty-eight Hours -- Homeward Bound -- The Stationmaster -- The Longest Night -- Bob, The Big Issue Cat.
    • Notes:
      "First published in Great Britain in 2012 by Hodder & Stoughton"--Title page verso.
    • ISBN:
      9781250029461 (hardback)
      1250029465 (hardback)
    • Accession Number:
      2013009948
    • Accession Number:
      ocn845084609
      845084609
    • Accession Number:
      fay.384324
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BOWEN, J. A street cat named Bob : and how he saved my life. First U.S. edition. [s. l.]: Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press, 2013. ISBN 9781250029461. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.384324. Acesso em: 8 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Bowen J. A Street Cat Named Bob : And How He Saved My Life. First U.S. edition. Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press; 2013. Accessed August 8, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.384324
    • APA:
      Bowen, J. (2013). A street cat named Bob : and how he saved my life (First U.S. edition.). Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Bowen, James. 2013. A Street Cat Named Bob : And How He Saved My Life. First U.S. edition. Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.384324.
    • Harvard:
      Bowen, J. (2013) A street cat named Bob : and how he saved my life. First U.S. edition. Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.384324 (Accessed: 8 August 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Bowen, J 2013, A street cat named Bob : and how he saved my life, First U.S. edition., Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press, viewed 8 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Bowen, James. A Street Cat Named Bob : And How He Saved My Life. First U.S. edition., Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press, 2013. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.384324.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Bowen, James. A Street Cat Named Bob : And How He Saved My Life. First U.S. edition. Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press, 2013. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.384324.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Bowen J. A street cat named Bob : and how he saved my life [Internet]. First U.S. edition. Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press; 2013 [cited 2020 Aug 8]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.384324

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2013 April #2

*Starred Review* Books abound on the subject of how a dog or a cat can rehabilitate a person's life, but this account of such an event is stellar. Only a heart of stone will not be moved—even to tears—in bearing witness to the love of a London street musician for the gorgeous ginger tomcat he found one day in his apartment building hallway. The cat, soon called Bob, was injured, so Bowen took him in but planned to nurse him only for a short while. After all, so Bowen's reasoning went, he had very little surplus money to feed another mouth, and Bob, a "man" of the streets, would undoubtedly soon tire of domesticity and one day run away to hit the streets again. But that never happened. Bowen was a recovering addict and was himself recently just off the streets, and he soon established an intensely simpatico relationship with Bob. He fixed Bob up—and fixed Bob—and took him with him every day as he played guitar at the usual corner spots he'd claimed for himself. Bob became an instant attraction, and the result was increased income for Bowen as more money was tossed into his guitar case. This is a beautiful, never maudlin story of second chances for both man and beast and a poignant testimony to how much caring for someone—or some feline—can give you renewed direction when you're down and out. Understandably, this was a best-seller when first published in Great Britain. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2013 February #2

Yes, you'll love Bob the Cat, the way you loved Marley, Oogy, and Dewey. London street musician Bowen was barely scraping by when he found the very sick, marmalade-striped feline in the hallway of his apartment building and nursed him back to health. Bob stuck it out, bonding with Bowen, and their artlessly told story was a No. 1 London Times best seller. There's even a film version planned, so buy up.

[Page 72]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ Reviews 2013 August #1

When recovering heroin addict and London street musician Bowen discovered an orange tomcat shivering in a dark hallway, he did what any animal lover would do. He took in the injured cat, nursed him back to health, and gave him a name—Bob. But what started as a kind gesture and a temporary arrangement became the seed of an unbreakable bond between human and feline. With stark honesty, Bowen tells the story of how Bob became his family, allowing the struggling busker to open his heart in ways he hadn't before. Bowen never expected to find his best friend—and, as it turns out, his salvation—in a street cat. VERDICT A heartwarming, insightful read about two lost souls who find each other, this book, a No. 1 London Times best seller, is not to be missed for fans of Lisa J. Edwards's A Dog Named Boo and Gwen Cooper's Homer's Odyssey. An inspiring story of healing, redemption, and, perhaps most important, the transformative powers of friendship. [See Prepub Alert, 1/25/13.]—Melissa Culbertson, Homewood, IL

[Page 112]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PW Reviews 2013 April #1

Bowen isn't exaggerating; when he met a stray ginger tomcat (whom he named Bob after the creepy character on Twin Peaks), he was estranged from his family and recovering from heroin addiction, supporting himself as a street musician in London, and depending on the kindness of strangers. His chance encounter with Bob in 2007 changed everything. The injured animal attached himself to Bowen, and quickly proved more than just an emotional asset; in the competitive world of busking, passersby began donating more money after Bob took up position next to Bowen's open guitar case. With Bob's friendship bolstering his spirits, and after a warning from the police, Bowen shifts to real work, selling the charity magazine Big Issue and getting off methadone. Despite the grimmer passages in the book—a run-in with a vicious dog, tension with fellow Big Issue vendors that lead to serious consequences—the book is positive on the whole. Bob becomes an Internet celebrity via YouTube videos taken by passerby, and Bowen reconciles with his mother and returns home to Australia for a cathartic visit. Given Bowen's inherent decency, he might well have turned things around even without his feline friend, but he convincingly makes the case that Bob was the cat-alyst. Agent: Mary Pachnos, Aitken Alexander Associates. (July)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC