Fortunately, the milk / by Neil Gaiman ; illustrated by Skottie Young.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: While picking up milk for his children's cereal, a father is abducted by aliens and finds himself on a wild adventure through time and space.
    • ISBN:
      9780062224071 (hardcover bdgs)
      0062224077 (hardcover bdgs)
    • Accession Number:
      2012050670
    • Accession Number:
      ocn825106456
      825106456
    • Accession Number:
      fay.388112
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      GAIMAN, N.; YOUNG, S. Fortunately, the milk. [s.l.] : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2013. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 16 set. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Gaiman N, Young S. Fortunately, the Milk. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers; 2013. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.388112. Accessed September 16, 2019.
    • APA:
      Gaiman, N., & Young, S. (2013). Fortunately, the milk. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.388112
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Gaiman, Neil, and Skottie Young. 2013. Fortunately, the Milk. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.388112.
    • Harvard:
      Gaiman, N. and Young, S. (2013) Fortunately, the milk. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.388112 (Accessed: 16 September 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Gaiman, N & Young, S 2013, Fortunately, the milk, Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, viewed 16 September 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Gaiman, Neil, and Skottie Young. Fortunately, the Milk. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2013. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.388112.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Gaiman, Neil, and Skottie Young. Fortunately, the Milk. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2013. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.388112.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Gaiman N, Young S. Fortunately, the milk [Internet]. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers; 2013 [cited 2019 Sep 16]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.388112

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2013 July #1

A little boy and his little sister awake one morning, milkless. Their mother is away on business, their father is buried in the paper, and their Toastios are dry. What are young siblings to do? They impress upon their father that his tea is also without milk and sit back to watch their plan take effect. But something goes amiss, and their father doesn't return and doesn't return some more. When he does, finally, he has a story to tell, a story involving aliens; pirates; ponies; wumpires (not the handsome, brooding kind); and a stegosaurus professor who pilots a Floaty-Ball-Person-Carrier (which looks suspiciously like a hot-air balloon). There is time travel, treachery, and ample adventure, and, fortunately, the milk he has procured is rescued at every turn. Gaiman's oversize, tongue-in-cheek narrative twists about like the impromptu nonsense it is, with quick turns, speed bumps, and one go-for-broke dairy deus ex machina. Young fills the pages with sketchy, highly stylized images, stretched and pointy, bringing the crazed imaginations to life with irrepressible energy. Children will devour this one, with or without milk. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: A national media campaign and select author appearances are on the docket to celebrate the release of Newbery Award–winning Gaiman's latest. Copyright 2013 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2014 Spring

A father goes out for milk for his children's cereal. He's abducted by aliens, escapes from pirates, and saves the universe from destruction. Dad arrives safely home and tells his story to his children, who don't believe him. This is high Brit silliness in the Douglas Adams tradition. Appropriately zany pen-and-ink drawings illustrate this shaggy-dog tale.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2013 #6

In this shaggiest of shaggy-dog stories, a father goes out for milk for his children's cereal. He is abducted by aliens, escapes from pirates, is rescued by a dinosaurian professor in a hot-air balloon, is threatened by piranhas (well, he might have made that bit up), outwits some vampires, and saves the universe from destruction, as well as saving the world from forces that wish to redecorate it (replacing mountains with throw-cushions, etc.). Dad arrives safely home with the milk and tells his story to his children, who don't believe him. "Not. Any. Of. It." This is high Brit silliness in the Douglas Adams, indeed Goon Show, tradition. Gaiman throws together the space-time continuum, plastic flamingoes, and a pirate queen and dares the reader to demur. The brief story, generously illustrated with appropriately zany pen-and-ink drawings, demands to be read aloud, because who could resist zoom, tworp, and thang, to say nothing of "a noise like a hundred elephantine snot balloons all deflating at once"? sarah elli Copyright 2013 Horn Book Magazine.

PW Reviews 2013 July #3

In a letter to readers, Gaiman explains that his rationale for writing this story, about a father who has taken an excessively long time to return from the corner store with milk for his children's breakfast, stems from his reconsideration of the father in The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish. That dad, he realized, is "not really a positive portrayal of fatherhood"—he is a lump. To compensate, "I would write a book in which a father did all of the sorts of exciting things that fathers actually do." He may have to try again: the father in this story is abducted by aliens, made to walk the plank by pirates, and rescued by a stegosaurus in a balloon, among other outrageous escapades. It reads like an extemporaneous riff by a clever father asked a question he doesn't want to answer, and it makes an excellent gift for those heroic fathers who consider reading aloud to their children one of parenthood's greatest joys. Young's wiry, exuberant b&w caricatures (not all seen by PW) are incorporated throughout. Ages 8–12. Author's agent: Merrilee Heifetz, Writers House. (Sept.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC