Searching for Sarah Rector : the richest black girl in America / Tonya Bolden.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Recounts the story of the 1914 disappearance of eleven-year-old Sarah Rector, an African American who was part of the Creek Indian people and whose land had made her wealthy, and what it reveals about race, money, and American society.
    • Content Notes:
      160 acres -- Three and a half dollars an acre -- Twelve and a half percent -- One million dollars.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (pages 66-67) and index.
    • ISBN:
      9781419708466 : HRD
      1419708465 : HRD
    • Accession Number:
      2012039254
    • Accession Number:
      fay.400959
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BOLDEN, T. Searching for Sarah Rector : the richest black girl in America. [s. l.]: Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2014. ISBN 9781419708466. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.400959. Acesso em: 26 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Bolden T. Searching for Sarah Rector : The Richest Black Girl in America. Abrams Books for Young Readers; 2014. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.400959
    • APA:
      Bolden, T. (2014). Searching for Sarah Rector : the richest black girl in America. Abrams Books for Young Readers.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Bolden, Tonya. 2014. Searching for Sarah Rector : The Richest Black Girl in America. Abrams Books for Young Readers. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.400959.
    • Harvard:
      Bolden, T. (2014) Searching for Sarah Rector : the richest black girl in America. Abrams Books for Young Readers. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.400959 (Accessed: 26 October 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Bolden, T 2014, Searching for Sarah Rector : the richest black girl in America, Abrams Books for Young Readers, viewed 26 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Bolden, Tonya. Searching for Sarah Rector : The Richest Black Girl in America. Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2014. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.400959.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Bolden, Tonya. Searching for Sarah Rector : The Richest Black Girl in America. Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2014. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.400959.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Bolden T. Searching for Sarah Rector : the richest black girl in America [Internet]. Abrams Books for Young Readers; 2014 [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.400959

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2014 February #1

*Starred Review* When Oklahoma became a state in 1907, young Sarah Rector was among the African American members of the Creek nation who were granted allotments of land. From a poor farming family, Sarah was 12 years old when an oil well drilled on her land became a gusher. A guardian was appointed to manage her rapidly increasing fortune until she came of age, and newspapers began to print poorly investigated and sometimes alarming stories about her. Rector's biography takes some unexpected turns as Bolden follows leads that slant the story one way, only to discover that the truth lies in another direction. In this meticulously researched book, she separates fact from fiction as she traces the relevant history of the Creek nation, land allotments in early twentieth-century Oklahoma, and Rector's life. Part of the story becomes Bolden's challenging search for reliable information, and she integrates some of those personal details into the narrative. Along the way, the book offers intriguing glimpses of American life during Rector's time period. Handsome design and excellent production enhance the effectiveness of the many archival illustrations, which include photos, maps, and legal documents. Like Scott Reynolds Nelson and Marc Aronson's Ain't Nothing But a Man (2007), this handsome book illuminates the process of historical research as well as the enigmatic figure in the spotlight. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2014 Fall

How Sarah Rector came into her money goes back to the Trail of Tears, when the Five Tribes were forcibly removed from their lands and resettled in Indian Territory. Black members of the Creek nation, Sarah's family's allotted land happened to sit on oil. Bolden unfortunately never found first-hand accounts, but the volume is handsomely designed, the history fascinating. Bib., glos., ind.