Bugged : How Insects Changed History / Sarah Albee ; illustrated by Robert Leighton.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Chronicles the rivalry between the human and insect worlds that draws on myriad disciplines to explain the varying roles that bugs have played in building and toppling empires as well as the bug stories behind infamous disasters.
    • Content Notes:
      The insect facts of life -- The horrible history of human hygiene -- The land of silk and honey -- Bad-news bugs -- The earliest epidemics -- Close encounters of the ancient kind -- Medieval microbes -- More thinking but still stinking: the Renaissance -- Travel troubles -- It's all fun and games until someone loses an isle -- How revolutionary! -- Dastardly diseases and demented dictators -- The Nineteenth Century: crawling toward a cure -- The nitty gritty about the itty bitty: germs discovered at last -- Twentieth-century pox -- The craze about sprays -- Now what?
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (pages 157-162) and index.
    • Other Titles:
      How insects have changed human history.
    • ISBN:
      9780802734228 (pbk.)
      0802734227 (pbk.)
      9780802734235 (library edition)
      0802734235 (library edition)
    • Accession Number:
      2013025968
    • Accession Number:
      ocn849210439
      849210439
    • Accession Number:
      fay.411377
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ALBEE, S.; LEIGHTON, R. Bugged : How Insects Changed History. [s. l.]: Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury, 2014. ISBN 9780802734228. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.411377. Acesso em: 28 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Albee S, Leighton R. Bugged : How Insects Changed History. Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury; 2014. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.411377. Accessed May 28, 2020.
    • APA:
      Albee, S., & Leighton, R. (2014). Bugged : How Insects Changed History. Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Albee, Sarah, and Robert Leighton. 2014. Bugged : How Insects Changed History. Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.411377.
    • Harvard:
      Albee, S. and Leighton, R. (2014) Bugged : How Insects Changed History. Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.411377 (Accessed: 28 May 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Albee, S & Leighton, R 2014, Bugged : How Insects Changed History, Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury, viewed 28 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Albee, Sarah, and Robert Leighton. Bugged : How Insects Changed History. Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury, 2014. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.411377.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Albee, Sarah, and Robert Leighton. Bugged : How Insects Changed History. Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury, 2014. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.411377.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Albee S, Leighton R. Bugged : How Insects Changed History [Internet]. Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury; 2014 [cited 2020 May 28]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.411377

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2014 February #1

From the author and illustrator of Poop Happened! (2010) comes a compendium of facts about insects and their role in shaping civilization. Malaria, yellow fever, typhus, and the plague have all played pivotal roles in history—halting colonization and travel, felling armies, and even bringing entire empires to their bubo-covered knees—and all of them are transmitted by bugs. Albee opens with the many ways insects are helpful to humans (as a source of food, in medical research), but those niceties belie the grossness that follows. Starting with evidence of insect-borne diseases in the Bible and ending with contemporary research and efforts to curb major epidemics, Albee follows a mostly chronological order, regularly interrupted by sidebars with fascinating facts about individual insects, scientists and policy makers, medical practices and discoveries, and infectious diseases. Thankfully, Leighton's mostly cartoon illustrations mean the visuals aren't scarily gross. Though there are a few missteps—a warning about eating bugs found in the yard should really come before the recipe for chocolate-covered crickets—this engrossing volume is jam-packed with enticingly gruesome world history. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2014 Fall

Colloquial yet accurate language delivers abundant information about how insects have affected history--usually for the worse (e.g., the plague-causing fleas of the fourteenth century). Albee excels at combining narrative, sidebars, quotations, and snappy headings ("Critter Transmitter") into a witty unified text, extended by archival images, photos, and Leighton's cartoons. Although this could be sensationalized, it's merely engaging. Reading list, websites. Glos., ind.