Three many cooks : one mom, two daughters : their shared stories of food, faith & family / Pam Anderson, Maggy Keet, Sharon Damelio.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: "When the women behind the popular blog Three Many Cooks gather in the busiest room in the house, there are never too many cooks in the kitchen. Now acclaimed cookbook author Pam Anderson and her daughters, Maggy Keet and Sharon Damelio, blend compelling reflections and well-loved recipes into one funny, candid, and irresistible book. Together, Pam, Maggy, and Sharon reveal the challenging give-and-take between mothers and daughters, the passionate belief that food nourishes both body and soul, and the simple wonder that arises from good meals shared. Pam chronicles her epicurean journey, beginning at the apron hems of her grandmother and mother, and recounts how a cultural exchange to Provence led to twenty-five years of food and friendship. Firstborn Maggy rebelled against the family's culinary ways but eventually found her inner chef as a newlywed faced with the terrifying reality of cooking dinner every night. Younger daughter Sharon fell in love with food by helping her mother work, lending her searing opinions and elbow grease to the grueling process of testing recipes for Pam's bestselling cookbooks. Three Many Cooks ladles out the highs and lows, the kitchen disasters and culinary triumphs, the bitter fights and lasting love. Of course, these stories would not be complete without a selection of treasured recipes that nurtured relationships, ended feuds, and expanded repertoires, recipes that evoke forgiveness, memory, passion, and perseverance: Pumpkin-Walnut Scones, baked by dueling sisters; Grilled Lemon Chicken, made legendary by Pam's father at every backyard cookout; Chicken Vindaloo that Maggy whipped up in a boat galley in the Caribbean; Carrot Cake obsessively perfected by Sharon for the wedding of friends; and many more. Sometimes irreverent, sometimes reflective, always honest, this collection illustrates three women's individual and shared search for a faith that confirms what they know to be true: The divine is often found hovering not over an altar but around the stove and kitchen table. So hop on a bar stool at the kitchen island and join them to commiserate, laugh, and, of course, eat!"-- Provided by publisher.
    • ISBN:
      9780804178952 (hardback)
      080417895X (hardback)
    • Accession Number:
      2014038602
    • Accession Number:
      ocn894149411
      894149411
    • Accession Number:
      fay.447520
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ANDERSON, P.; KEET, M.; DAMELIO, S. Three many cooks : one mom, two daughters : their shared stories of food, faith & family. [s. l.]: Ballantine Books, 2015. ISBN 9780804178952. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.447520. Acesso em: 6 dez. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Anderson P, Keet M, Damelio S. Three Many Cooks : One Mom, Two Daughters : Their Shared Stories of Food, Faith & Family. Ballantine Books; 2015. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.447520. Accessed December 6, 2019.
    • APA:
      Anderson, P., Keet, M., & Damelio, S. (2015). Three many cooks : one mom, two daughters : their shared stories of food, faith & family. Ballantine Books. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.447520
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Anderson, Pam, Maggy Keet, and Sharon Damelio. 2015. Three Many Cooks : One Mom, Two Daughters : Their Shared Stories of Food, Faith & Family. Ballantine Books. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.447520.
    • Harvard:
      Anderson, P., Keet, M. and Damelio, S. (2015) Three many cooks : one mom, two daughters : their shared stories of food, faith & family. Ballantine Books. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.447520 (Accessed: 6 December 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Anderson, P, Keet, M & Damelio, S 2015, Three many cooks : one mom, two daughters : their shared stories of food, faith & family, Ballantine Books, viewed 6 December 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Anderson, Pam, et al. Three Many Cooks : One Mom, Two Daughters : Their Shared Stories of Food, Faith & Family. Ballantine Books, 2015. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.447520.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Anderson, Pam, Maggy Keet, and Sharon Damelio. Three Many Cooks : One Mom, Two Daughters : Their Shared Stories of Food, Faith & Family. Ballantine Books, 2015. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.447520.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Anderson P, Keet M, Damelio S. Three many cooks : one mom, two daughters : their shared stories of food, faith & family [Internet]. Ballantine Books; 2015 [cited 2019 Dec 6]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.447520

Reviews

LJ Reviews 2014 November #2

New York Times best-selling author Anderson is AARP's official food expert. One daughter, Maggy Keet, founded and runs the Big Potluck, which creates inspirational community-focused events for food media; another, Sharon Damelio, works at a nonprofit that aids the homeless and near homeless. You can imagine the power of food, faith, and fun that shines through in this memoir.

[Page 63]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ Reviews 2015 March #1

Anderson (Cook Without a Book: Meatless Meals) and her two adult daughters, who together write a blog after which this book was named, take turns penning chapters in this tri-authored memoir, ending each section with a recipe that ties into the subject at hand. The women delve into topics both mundane and profound, from washing out baggies to growing apart in a marriage. The down-to-earth narratives have distinct voices yet all believe in the importance of shared meals and cooking with the ones you love: food as nourishment; food as connection; food as healing balm. Faith is gently present in many chapters, and wine and cocktails are a part of several meals. These are warm and comforting autobiographical essays from real folks who celebrate the role of food in their lives. VERDICT More prose than cookbook, this work will be enjoyed by cooks and noncooks alike. The 26 recipes are easy to follow (though not always simple) and most are forgiving of substitutions (e.g., this cheese for that, store-bought pie crust for homemade). The book's highest readership will be found in libraries where cookbooks circulate well.—Maggie Knapp, Trinity Valley Sch., Fort Worth, TX

[Page 106]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PW Reviews 2015 March #3

Accomplished cookbook author Anderson (Perfect One-Dish Dinners, etc.) teams up with her two grown daughters for a warm, gracious extension of their blog, Three Many Cooks, featuring homey tales and easy-preparation recipes. In alternating chapters, the three describe how the young women caught the foodie bug from their mother, a Southern-bred trailer-house only child who became a caterer, then a test cook for Cook's Illustrated magazine in the 1980s while her husband went to Yale Divinity School. As Anderson gradually mastered the cooking trade and began writing her own cookbooks (each with the word "perfect" in the title), her girls were the "guinea pigs" for many of her tasting experiments- failed versions ended up in their lunch boxes, and one summer in Maine the family had to endure Pam's "new status as a serial crustacean killer" as she created recipes for her How to Cook Lobster Perfectly. The daughters write that they grew to respect the craft of cooking more as they traveled, married, and started their own households, and all three authors express (rather repetitively) the shared values of work ethic and "the gift of thrift." The recipes are certainly well tested, and the message plainspoken and unfussy. (Apr.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC