A dog's history of the world : canines and the domestication of humans / Laura Hobgood-Oster.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Traces the complex history and complicated relationship between canines and humans.
    • Content Notes:
      Strangers no more : partners in the hunt and herd -- Journey to the afterlife : best friends forever -- Healing and saving : life is better with dogs -- Canines and conquest : invasion, empire, and dogs of war -- Dogs of design : the Frankenstein syndrome in a changing world -- The dog-human bond : domesticating each other.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (pages 161-178) and index.
    • ISBN:
      9781481300193 (hardback : acid-free paper)
      1481300199 (hardback : acid-free paper)
    • Accession Number:
      2013023938
    • Accession Number:
      ocn854541610
      854541610
    • Accession Number:
      fay.448326
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      HOBGOOD-OSTER, L. A dog’s history of the world : canines and the domestication of humans. [s. l.]: Baylor University Press, 2014. ISBN 9781481300193. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448326. Acesso em: 8 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Hobgood-Oster L. A Dog’s History of the World : Canines and the Domestication of Humans. Baylor University Press; 2014. Accessed August 8, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448326
    • APA:
      Hobgood-Oster, L. (2014). A dog’s history of the world : canines and the domestication of humans. Baylor University Press.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Hobgood-Oster, Laura. 2014. A Dog’s History of the World : Canines and the Domestication of Humans. Baylor University Press. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448326.
    • Harvard:
      Hobgood-Oster, L. (2014) A dog’s history of the world : canines and the domestication of humans. Baylor University Press. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448326 (Accessed: 8 August 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Hobgood-Oster, L 2014, A dog’s history of the world : canines and the domestication of humans, Baylor University Press, viewed 8 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Hobgood-Oster, Laura. A Dog’s History of the World : Canines and the Domestication of Humans. Baylor University Press, 2014. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448326.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Hobgood-Oster, Laura. A Dog’s History of the World : Canines and the Domestication of Humans. Baylor University Press, 2014. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448326.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Hobgood-Oster L. A dog’s history of the world : canines and the domestication of humans [Internet]. Baylor University Press; 2014 [cited 2020 Aug 8]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448326

Reviews

LJ Reviews 2014 June #1

Dog lovers will be fascinated by this history of the relationship between canines and humans by Hobgood-Oster (religion and environmental studies, Southwestern Univ.; The Friends We Keep). Despite the book's short length, the author covers a lot of ground. She begins by looking at the initial domestication of canines approximately 15,000 years ago, noting that the canines stood to gain as much from people (e.g., eating food scraps early humans threw away) as people benefited from the protection and company of canines. She goes on to explore the role dogs played in religious rituals, war, and medicine throughout human history and convincingly argues that unlike other domesticated animals, dogs occupy a unique place, whether curling up next to their master's feet or fighting alongside soldiers in World War II. The final chapter argues for the continued respect and care of dogs, particularly those breeds seen as "pariahs" or "monsters" in our culture (she explores at length the negative reputation pit bulls have acquired in our society as violent and unstable animals) and reminds the reader, "Humans are who we are in large part because dogs have shared this life with us." VERDICT This quick, easy read will delight dog and animal lovers of all ages as well as those interested in anthropology and history.—Jennifer Stout, Virginia Commonwealth Univ. Lib., Richmond

[Page 125]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.