Why'd they wear that? : fashion as the mirror of history / Sarah Albee ; foreword by Timothy Gunn.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Learn about outrageous, politically-perilous, funky, disgusting, regrettable, and life-threatening creations people have worn throughout the course of human history, all the way up to the present day. From spats and togas to hoop skirts and hair shirts, why people wore what they did is an illuminating way to look at the social, economic, political, and moral climates throughout history.
    • Content Notes:
      That's a wrap: the ancient world: 10,000 B.C. - A.D. 1000 -- Keeping the faith: the middle ages: 1000 - 1400s -- Going global: the age of exploration: 1400s - early 1500s -- Ruff & ready: the Renaissance: 1500s - early 1600s -- Lighten up!: the age of reason: 1600s - 1700s -- Hats (and heads) off: revolutionary times: mid-1600s - early 1800s -- Growing pains: marching toward modernity: mid-1700s - early 1900s -- Labor pains: the industrial revolution: mid-1800s - early 1900s -- Class dismissed: world at war: the 20th century & beyond -- What can you do? -- Time line.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (pages 185-186) and index.
    • Other Titles:
      Why did they wear that?
    • ISBN:
      9781426319198 (hbk.)
      1426319193 (hbk.)
      9781426319204 (reinforced library binding)
      1426319207 (reinforced library binding)
    • Accession Number:
      ocn899704609
      899704609
    • Accession Number:
      fay.448894
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ALBEE, S.; GUNN, T. Why’d they wear that? : fashion as the mirror of history. [s. l.]: National Geographic, 2015. ISBN 9781426319198. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448894. Acesso em: 28 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Albee S, Gunn T. Why’d They Wear That? : Fashion as the Mirror of History. National Geographic; 2015. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448894. Accessed May 28, 2020.
    • APA:
      Albee, S., & Gunn, T. (2015). Why’d they wear that? : fashion as the mirror of history. National Geographic.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Albee, Sarah, and Tim Gunn. 2015. Why’d They Wear That? : Fashion as the Mirror of History. National Geographic. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448894.
    • Harvard:
      Albee, S. and Gunn, T. (2015) Why’d they wear that? : fashion as the mirror of history. National Geographic. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448894 (Accessed: 28 May 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Albee, S & Gunn, T 2015, Why’d they wear that? : fashion as the mirror of history, National Geographic, viewed 28 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Albee, Sarah, and Tim Gunn. Why’d They Wear That? : Fashion as the Mirror of History. National Geographic, 2015. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448894.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Albee, Sarah, and Tim Gunn. Why’d They Wear That? : Fashion as the Mirror of History. National Geographic, 2015. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448894.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Albee S, Gunn T. Why’d they wear that? : fashion as the mirror of history [Internet]. National Geographic; 2015 [cited 2020 May 28]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.448894

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2015 February #2

What a good idea for a book. And what a smart way to do it. As the subtitle says, this hefty, extensively illustrated book uses fashion to discuss the ways and whys people dress and how it reflects what's happening in their civilization. This massive task is divided into manageable bits through clever design and pithy headings, including a seemingly endless supply of plays on "dress for success," like "dressed to protest" and "dressed to compress" (corsets). Starting at about 2000 BCE, the book moves briskly across continents, explaining not just dress but footwear, ways of cleaning clothes (not terribly successfully), fashion disasters (including using arsenic as an ingredient in textiles), and how society changed fashion—and how fashion changed society. The many photographs are well chosen and reproduced, and Albee writes in a conversational style that, though occasionally repetitive, is instantly appealing to readers. Tim Gunn writes the foreword, and a time line and bibliography conclude. Dressed to impress! Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2015 Fall

Albee comprehensively and conversationally examines how fashion has shaped history, and vice versa. Organized chronologically, the text explains how a trend or clothing item originated and what function it served, with numerous accompanying illustrations and photos; side boxes provide additional context (e.g., "How did [knights] go to the bathroom?"). A fascinating read for fashion and history aficionados. Reading list, timeline, websites. Bib., ind.

PW Reviews 2014 December #3

Full of period images that show off every bustle, frill, and rivet, this wide-ranging guide to clothing throughout time will fascinate history and fashion buffs alike. Albee gives overviews of Renaissance, Elizabethan, and Baroque fashions (among many others), while highlighting how economic and social changes were often directly reflected in clothing—during the Great Depression, for instance, costume jewelry replaced more expensive accessories. In the 1920s, flapper dresses represented women's liberation, and the styles of the 1960s and 1970s were sometimes inspired by current events (following the moon landing, the "space age" look became the rage). Albee also highlights the extremes to which individuals will go to conform to fleeting ideals of physical beauty—such as the practice of binding feet in China or the wearing of whalebone corsages and crinolines. An insightful study of how clothing is shaped by—and sometimes helps shape—history. Ages 10–up. (Feb.)

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