How to grow up : a memoir / Michelle Tea.

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    • Abstract:
      Summary: "A gutsy, wise memoir-in-essays from a writer praised as "impossible to put down" (People) As an aspiring young writer in San Francisco, Michelle Tea lived in a scuzzy communal house; she drank, smoked, snorted anything she got her hands on; she toiled for the minimum wage; and she dated men and women, and sometimes both at once. But between hangovers and dead-end jobs, she scrawled in notebooks and organized dive bar poetry readings, working to make her literary dreams real. In How to Grow Up, Tea shares her awkward stumble towards the life of a Bonafide Grown-Up: healthy, responsible, self-aware, stable. She writes about passion, about her fraught relationship with money, about adoring Barney's while shopping at thrift stores, about breakups and the fertile ground between relationships, about roommates and rent, and about being superstitious ("why not, it imbues this harsh world of ours with a bit of magic.") At once heartwarming and darkly comic, How to Grow Up proves that the road less traveled may be a difficult one, but if you embrace life's uncertainty and dust yourself off after every screw up, slowly but surely you just might make it to adulthood. "-- Provided by publisher.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: "In How to Grow Up, Tea shares her awkward stumble towards the life of a Bonafide Grown-Up: healthy, responsible, self-aware, stable. She writes about passion, about her fraught relationship with money, about adoring Barney's while shopping at thrift stores, about breakups and the fertile ground between relationships, about roommates and rent, and about being superstitious. How to Grow Up proves that the road less traveled may be a difficult one, but if you embrace life's uncertainty and dust yourself off after every screw up, slowly but surely you just might make it to adulthood"-- Provided by publisher.
    • Content Notes:
      You deserve this -- Fashion victim -- My $1,100 birthday apartment -- I have a trust fund from God, and so do you! -- Beware of sex and other rules for love -- How to break up -- Too cool for school -- The baddest Buddhist -- Getting pregnant with Michelle Tea -- Ask not for whom the wedding bell tolls -- You can't fire me; I quit -- WWYMD: what would young Michelle do? -- Eat me -- I'm so vain -- Confessions of a gym rat.
    • Notes:
      "A Plume Book"--Title page.
    • ISBN:
      9780142181195 (trade pbk.)
      0142181196 (trade pbk.)
    • LCCN:
      2014032902
    • OCLC:
      ocn890011387
      890011387
    • Accession Number:
      fay.451537

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2015 January #1

Author-editor Tea is wacky, bravely wild, bisexual, inventive, and a good writer (e.g., Rose of No Man's Land, 2006). She never finished college, yet she made it and made it on her own, her own way. Her newest, chatty memoir details how she shoplifted, drank, drugged, and 12-stepped her way to being a grown-up, and it's a delightful, uplifting roller-coaster ride of a book. Things that get others down (poverty, homelessness, insects in the communal refrigerator) simply spur her good-naturedly, questingly onward. To say she is an inspiration doesn't quite work—her path is too brambly and unusual for many to tread—yet her book is full of the kinds of stories that will just make readers feel good (and feel like persevering as well). "Find a place that reminds you that the world is so much bigger than your heart and whoever broke it this time around." Tea finds love, that she can pay the bills, and that—holy smoke—she's written the book you're reading now! An optimistic, funny, advice-filled look at an unusual life being lived to the hilt. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews Newsletter

As memoirist Tea (Valencia) approaches age 40, she decides it's time to leave the maggot-infested refrigerator in her rundown communal house in San Francisco's Mission District and move into a place of her own. Acknowledging an arrested development resulting from years of alcoholism and addiction, she stumbles toward adulthood with the new clarity of sobriety. Along the way, she dates and breaks up with men and women, repeats affirmations for money, prays to Stevie Nicks, and slouches her way to that elusive life stage we call adulthood. VERDICT Tea's charming and self-effacing humor makes this a delightful read for those who are on their own path to adulthood or fully developed adults who want to remind themselves of how far they've come. (Do those people exist?) (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ Reviews 2015 June #1

As memoirist Tea (Valencia) approaches age 40, she decides it's time to leave the maggot-infested refrigerator in her rundown communal house in San Francisco's Mission District and move into a place of her own. Acknowledging an arrested development resulting from years of alcoholism and addiction, she stumbles toward adulthood with the new clarity of sobriety. Along the way, she dates and breaks up with men and women, repeats affirmations for money, prays to Stevie Nicks, and slouches her way to that elusive life stage we call adulthood. VERDICT Tea's charming and self-effacing humor makes this a delightful read for those who are on their own path to adulthood or fully developed adults who want to remind themselves of how far they've come. (Do those people exist?) [See Memoir, 12/16/14; ow.ly/MBEsA.]—ES

[Page 121]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PW Reviews 2014 November #2

Tea has written memoirs (e.g., The Chelsea Whistle) about what it's like to be "born broke, or weird, into tricky families and unsafe towns," and now comes this tough, quirky volume from the "trembling hard-won perch of adulthood." The story begins with Tea, age 37 in San Francisco, newly free of a ne'er-do-well ex-boyfriend and sober after nearly killing herself with drugs and alcohol, but living in a group house with "drug-addled 20-somethings cavorting naked through the hallways." After deciding she would be a wreck if she turned 40 in that house, she claws her way out: first, she gets a job teaching writing, which she abandons to visit Paris; next, she finds a boyfriend who appears civilized but proves to be cruel; finally, she rents an apartment of her own, makes enough money to safely indulge in a $900 leather hoodie, and gets married to a happy woman. Tea's memoir begins as a narrative, then becomes more of an essay collection. Chapters survey her personalized spirituality ("The Baddest Buddhist") and her self-care through food ("Eat Me"). The overall feel is of a lecture delivered in the language of self-help: are you "walking on eggshells" in your relationship? This is messy, like Tea's story, but the narrator is charming and dogged enough to make readers glad that both they and she stuck it out. Agent: Lindsay Edgecombe, Levine Greenberg Literary Agency.(Jan.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC