America the beautiful / [Katharine Lee Bates] ; paper engineer, Robert Sabuda.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st ed.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: A pop-up book which illustrates the first verse of "America the Beautiful," line by line, from the Golden Gate Bridge to the Statue of Liberty, and includes an attached smaller book containing an additional pop-up illustration for each later verse.
    • Notes:
      Cover title.
    • ISBN:
      0689847440 (hbk.)
      9780689847448 (hbk.)
    • Accession Number:
      2005282945
    • Accession Number:
      ocm62741594
      62741594
    • Accession Number:
      fay.453498

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2004 November #2

Gr. 2-4. Sabuda's pop-up "America the Beautiful" presents stately paper sculptures of icons of the American landscape, rendered primarily in marmoreal white. The engineering is a bit creakier than it was in his Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (2003), and the large, complex constructions--especially Mesa Verde, whose contours may be less familiar than, say, the adjacent pop-up of Mount Rushmore--would have benefited from variations of color and texture. Nonetheless, this will add a welcome flourish to election- and inauguration-themed displays. Metallic embellishments on the cover and throughout will dazzle children, as will finely wrought details such as the tiny Abraham Lincoln statue visible through the columns of the Lincoln Memorial, and an inset minibook containing all verses to the song (and, of course, its own tiny pops). For contrast, pull out Chris Gill's color-drenched America the Beautiful [BKL My 1 04] or Barbara Younger's story of the song's origins, Purple Mountain Majesties (1998). Occasional bits of plastic and string make this unsuitable for children under five to use without adult supervision, but children younger than the target audience, as well as grown-ups, will also enjoy browsing. ((Reviewed November 15, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Spring

The first verse of the patriotic anthem (unattributed to Katharine Lee Bates here) is presented on double-page spreads that feature Sabuda's signature pop-up illustrations. Readers will be awed by the intricately crafted cutouts depicting the Golden Gate Bridge, Mount Rushmore, a Mississippi River steamship, and the Statue of Liberty. Rendered mostly in pure white, Sabuda's paper creations have an enduring, classic quality. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

PW Reviews 2004 September #2

Starched-white shapes of icons such as the Statue of Liberty and a Mississippi riverboat unfold in this patriotic pop-up. Paper engineer Sabuda (The Christmas Alphabet) goes line-by-line through the first stanza of the celebratory "America the Beautiful," pairing "O beautiful for spacious skies" with a red-on-white Golden Gate Bridge and boats cutting silver-foil ribbons through the water. Line two, "For amber waves of grain," exalts "The Great Plains"; here, a tractor foregrounds symmetrical rows of crops, a rooster crows on a barn roof and a string mechanism allows readers to turn a windmill's blades. Inside the closing spread ("From sea to shining sea!"), which pictures a minimalist Manhattan with foil-windowed skyscrapers, a small book-within-a-book provides mini-pop-ups (the Twin Towers, Liberty Bell and an American eagle) and lyrics to the lesser-known verses by "Katharine Lee Bates July 4, 1895." Skeptics may be taken aback that the "amber" grain and "purple mountain majesties" of Mount Rushmore spring up icy white. The author also takes liberties with mapping, for instance placing the Lincoln Memorial and Washington Monument perpendicular to the U.S. Capitol on the National Mall. The dove-white imagery, pure as snow, which worked so effectively in Sabuda's Christmas books, here suggests the rich connotations of the simple verses, but also sanitizes the complex topics. Sabuda's paper engineering impresses as usual, but the presentation seems more decorative than awe-inspiring. All ages. (Oct.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.