Finding Winnie : the true story of the world's most famous bear / by Lindsay Mattick ; illustrated by Sophie Blackall.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: A woman tells her young son the true story of how his great-great-grandfather, Captain Harry Colebourn, rescued and learned to love a bear cub in 1914 as he was on his way to take care of soldiers' horses during World War I, and the bear became the inspiration for A.A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh.
    • ISBN:
      9780316324908
      0316324906
    • Accession Number:
      2014041122
    • Accession Number:
      ocn894149533
      894149533
    • Accession Number:
      fay.464675
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MATTICK, L.; BLACKALL, S. Finding Winnie : the true story of the world’s most famous bear. First edition. [s. l.]: Little, Brown and Company, 2015. ISBN 9780316324908. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.464675. Acesso em: 3 abr. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Mattick L, Blackall S. Finding Winnie : The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear. First edition. Little, Brown and Company; 2015. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.464675. Accessed April 3, 2020.
    • APA:
      Mattick, L., & Blackall, S. (2015). Finding Winnie : the true story of the world’s most famous bear (First edition.). Little, Brown and Company.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Mattick, Lindsay, and Sophie Blackall. 2015. Finding Winnie : The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear. First edition. Little, Brown and Company. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.464675.
    • Harvard:
      Mattick, L. and Blackall, S. (2015) Finding Winnie : the true story of the world’s most famous bear. First edition. Little, Brown and Company. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.464675 (Accessed: 3 April 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Mattick, L & Blackall, S 2015, Finding Winnie : the true story of the world’s most famous bear, First edition., Little, Brown and Company, viewed 3 April 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Mattick, Lindsay, and Sophie Blackall. Finding Winnie : The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear. First edition., Little, Brown and Company, 2015. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.464675.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Mattick, Lindsay, and Sophie Blackall. Finding Winnie : The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear. First edition. Little, Brown and Company, 2015. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.464675.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Mattick L, Blackall S. Finding Winnie : the true story of the world’s most famous bear [Internet]. First edition. Little, Brown and Company; 2015 [cited 2020 Apr 3]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.464675

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2015 September #1

*Starred Review* Mattick's family ties to Winnie-the-Pooh form the backbone of her cozy debut. Framed as Mattick telling a bedtime story to her young son, Cole, her tale begins in 1914 in Canada, when veterinarian Harry Colebourn, her own great-grandfather, sets off to join the war in Europe. A fateful whistle-stop encounter with a gentle bear cub begins the historic friendship, when Colebourn buys the cub for 20 dollars. Though officers in Colebourn's division were initially aghast that he would bring a wild animal along, they were quickly won over by her irrepressible charm (and appetite), and the bear, named Winnipeg after their hometown, became the division's mascot. Winnie accompanied the soldiers all the way to England, where Colebourn eventually took Winnie to the London Zoo. There Christopher Robin met Winnie and the rest is literary history. Blackall's warm, beautiful gouache-and-ink illustrations capture an impressive depth of feeling, even in relatively simplified faces. The visuals not only complement the fablelike cadences of Mattick's text but also include subtle details that enrich the story—the opening pages, for instance, recall a storybook forest before melting into the surroundings of Cole's bedroom, where he hears the story of Colebourn and Winnie. Little ones who love A. A. Milne's classic stories will be enchanted by this heartening account of the bear's real-life origins. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2016 Spring

A boy's mother tells him the story of his great-great-grandfather, owner of a baby bear named Winnie, and the circumstances that led to another boy, Christopher Robin Milne, befriending Winnie--inspiring that boy's father to write some children's tales. Mattick, the storytelling mother in this book, embellishes her family's history with evocative, playful language, matched by the period warmth of Blackall's carefully composed images.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2015 #5

A little boy named Cole curls in the crook of his mother's arm and asks for a story; she spins him two. The first one tells of a veterinarian, Harry Colebourn, who buys a baby bear at a train station on his way from Winnipeg to the WWI European Theater. He calls her Winnie, and the two become deeply attached, until Harry ships out to France, regretfully depositing Winnie at the London Zoo. There the second story begins, wherein a little boy named Christopher Robin Milne befriends Winnie, playing with her in her enclosure and inspiring his father to write some most beloved children's tales. The end of the second story closes the loop by bringing us back to the little boy in his bedroom: Harry Colebourn was Cole's great-great-grandfather, for whom he is named, and our stories are true. Mattick, who's the storytelling mother in this book Copyright 2014 Horn Book Magazine.

PW Reviews 2015 July #3

Mattick is the great-granddaughter of Capt. Harry Colebourn, the Canadian veterinarian who set all things Winnie-the-Pooh in motion: while en route to join his unit during WWI, Harry rescued an orphaned bear cub from a trapper (it cost him $20) and named her Winnipeg (Winnie for short), after his hometown. She accompanied Harry to England and became the mascot of the Second Canadian Infantry Brigade. Knowing Winnie couldn't follow him to France, Harry arranged for a new home for her at London Zoo, where a boy named Christopher Robin discovered her, and the rest is literary history. Framed as a bedtime story that Mattick tells her toddler son, Cole (who interjects questions such as "Is twenty dollars a lot?"), the book strikes a lovely, understated tone of wonder and family pride. It also suits Blackall (A Fine Dessert) to a T. While her work usually has a strong streak of fantasy, or at least ethereal otherworldliness, she proves that she's equally imaginative at chronicling straight-on reality, too. Ages 3–6. Author's agent: Jackie Kaiser, Westwood Creative Artists. Illustrator's agent: Nancy Gallt, Nancy Gallt Literary Agency. (Oct.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2015 PWxyz LLC