How I discovered poetry / Marilyn Nelson ; illustrations by Hadley Hooper.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: The author reflects on her childhood in the 1950s and her development as an artist and young woman through fifty poems that consider such influences as the Civil Rights Movement, the "Red Scare" era, and the feminist movement.
    • Content Notes:
      Blue footsies (Cleveland, Ohio, 1950) -- Church (Cleveland, Ohio, 1950) -- Called up (Cleveland, Ohio, 1951) -- Texas protection (James Connally AFB, Texas 1951) -- Telling time (James Connally AFB, Texas 1951) -- Bomb drill (Lackland AFB, Texas, 1952) -- Pink menace (Lackland AFB, Texas 1952) -- A snake (Lowry AFB, Colorado, 1955) -- Your own (Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1953) -- Bad name ((Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1954) -- Sonic book ((Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1954) -- Career girl ((Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1954) -- Making history ((Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1955) -- Gold box ((Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1955) -- Kemo Sabe ((Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1955) -- Mississippi ((Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1955) -- Glow-in-the-dark ((Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1956) -- Travenling light ((Smoky Hill AFB, Kansas 1956) -- Just pick a name (On the road, 1956) -- Say It (Mather AFB, California, 1956) -- Moonlily ((Mather AFB, California, 1956) -- Cloud-gathering ((Mather AFB, California, 1956) -- Sputnik ((Mather AFB, California, 1957) -- Darkroom (Mather AFB, California, 1957) -- Nelsons (On the road, 1957) -- Fieldwork (Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1957) -- Caucasian dinner (Kittery Point , Maine, 1958) -- Ghost ((Kittery Point, Maine, 1958) -- Attic window (Kittery Point, Maine, 1958) -- Paper dolls ((Kittery Point, Maine, 1958) -- Queen of the sixth grade ((Kittery Point, Maine, 1958) -- Aooga ((Kittery Point, Maine, 1958)) -- Beautiful hair ((Kittery Point, Maine, 1958) -- Critic (Kittery Point, Maine, 1959) -- Parking lot dawn (On the road, 1959) -- A drift of girlfriends (Sacramento, California, 1959) -- Africans (Sacramento, California, 1959) -- Bitter apple (Sacramento, California, 1959) -- The history of tribal suppression (On the road, 1959) -- Sinfonia concertante (Fort Worth, Texas, 1959) -- Mischieving ((Fort Worth, Texas, 1959) -- To Miss Jackson ((Fort Worth, Texas, 1959) -- Let me count the ways (On the road, 1959) -- A quartet of geeks (Clinton-Sherman AFB, Oklahoma, 1959) -- Dances with doorknobs (Clinton-Sherman AFB, Oklahoma, 1959) -- My friends (Clinton-Sherman AFB, Oklahoma, 1959) -- The baby picture guessing game (Clinton-Sherman AFB, Oklahoma, 1959) -- Safe path through quicksand Clinton-Sherman AFB, Oklahoma, 1959 -- How I discovered poetry Clinton-Sherman AFB, Oklahoma, 1959) -- Thirteen-year-old American Negro girl Clinton-Sherman AFB, Oklahoma, 1959).
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references.
      Coretta Scott King Author Honor Book, 2015
    • Other Titles:
      Poems. Selections
    • ISBN:
      9780803733046
      0803733046
      9780605861763
      0605861765
    • Accession Number:
      2013005289
    • Accession Number:
      ocn830837453
      830837453
    • Accession Number:
      fay.491215
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      NELSON, M.; HOOPER, H. How I discovered poetry. [s.l.] : Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, 2014. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 14 out. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Nelson M, Hooper H. How I Discovered Poetry. Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; 2014. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.491215. Accessed October 14, 2019.
    • APA:
      Nelson, M., & Hooper, H. (2014). How I discovered poetry. Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.491215
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Nelson, Marilyn, and Hadley Hooper. 2014. How I Discovered Poetry. Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.491215.
    • Harvard:
      Nelson, M. and Hooper, H. (2014) How I discovered poetry. Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.491215 (Accessed: 14 October 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Nelson, M & Hooper, H 2014, How I discovered poetry, Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, viewed 14 October 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Nelson, Marilyn, and Hadley Hooper. How I Discovered Poetry. Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, 2014. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.491215.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Nelson, Marilyn, and Hadley Hooper. How I Discovered Poetry. Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, 2014. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.491215.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Nelson M, Hooper H. How I discovered poetry [Internet]. Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; 2014 [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.491215

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2014 March #2

In this fictionalized memoir in verse, renowned poet Nelson lyrically recounts her passage from ages 4 to 14, from numerous military base homes; through friends, schools, and dogs; and from developmental stages of initiative through industry to identity. Chronicling the decade of 1950s America, a young self-aware speaker connects national events to daily life experiences. In the author's note of her self-ascribed "portrait of an artist as a young American Negro girl," Nelson disclaims that the "I" in the title is she. Rather, her autobiographically inspired collection of 50 nonrhyming sonnets is enhanced by research and imagination. The title poem comes near the end and is breathtaking in the perverse cruelty the young speaker experiences from an educator. Hooper's line-and-shade illustrations, along with Nelson's family photos, set a quiet and respectful tone and offer readers the feeling of taking an unsolicited peek behind a heavy curtain. For fans of Nelson's impressive body of children's and adult poetry, including the brilliant A Wreath for Emmett Till (2005), this insight into her modulated memories gratifies that heartfelt belief that here writes a woman of great substance. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2014 Fall

In fifty poems (some previously published) Nelson chronicles her formative years during the 1950s, from ages four to thirteen. Nelson's father was a military officer, and as the family crisscrossed the country they encountered racism (both subtle and not-so-subtle types) but also loving kindness. A few family photos are included, rounded out by spare spot art that underscores the time period.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2014 #1

In fifty poems (some previously published) Nelson chronicles her formative years during the 1950s, from age four to thirteen, against the backdrop of the cold war and stirrings of the civil rights movement and women's lib. Each piece includes a title ("Blue Footsies" begins the book), a date, and a place name. Nelson's father was a military officer--"one of the first African American career officers in the Air Force"--and the family crisscrossed the country. Nelson's mother was a teacher who instilled in her children the importance of breaking ground: "Mama says First Negroes are History: / First Negro Telephone Operator, / First Negro Opera Singer at the Met, / First Negro Pilots, First Supreme Court Judge." Throughout their travels the family encountered racism (both the subtle and not-so-subtle types) but also loving kindness from friends and neighbors. The book ends with "Thirteen-Year-Old American Negro Girl," in which Nelson realizes that poetry is her metier and that it will be her contribution to the world. Her author's note calls this volume a "late-career retrospective...a 'portrait of the artist as a young American Negro Girl,'" and readers will be gratified to follow the progression of "the Speaker" (as Nelson refers to the main character, "whose life is very much like mine") from tentative child to self-possessed young woman on the cusp of a creative awakening. A few family photos are included, rounded out by spare 1950s-ish spot art that underscores the time period and accentuates the deeply personal nature of the remembrances. elissa gershowit Copyright 2013 Horn Book Magazine.

PW Reviews 2013 November #2

Nelson crafts a stirring autobiography in verse, focusing on her childhood in the 1950s, when her family frequently moved between military bases. Complemented by muted screen print–like illustrations, Nelson's 50 poems are composed of raw reflections on formative events, including her development as a reader and writer. The political and social climate of the 1950s infuses the poems through references to bomb drills at school ("Everybody's motto is Be Prepared,/ so we practice tragic catastrophes"), the Red Scare, the death of Emmett Till, and the stirrings of the civil rights movement. Nelson's introduction to poetry reads like falling in love: "It was like soul-kissing, the way the words/ filled my mouth as Mrs. Purdy read from her desk./ All the other kids zoned an hour ahead to 3:15,/ but Mrs. Purdy and I wandered lonely as clouds borne/ by a breeze off Mount Parnassus." An intimate perspective on a tumultuous era and an homage to the power of language. Ages 12–up. Illustrator's agent: Marlena Agency. (Jan.)

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