Autumn / David Moody.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st ed.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: A hybrid of War of the worlds and Night of the living dead, chronicles the struggle of a small group of survivors forced to contend with a world torn apart by a deadly disease.
    • ISBN:
      9780312569983
      031256998X
    • Accession Number:
      2010032676
    • Accession Number:
      ocn606785339
      606785339
    • Accession Number:
      fay.503472
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MOODY, D. Autumn. 1st ed. [s. l.]: Thomas Dunne Books, 2010. ISBN 9780312569983. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.503472. Acesso em: 24 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Moody D. Autumn. 1st ed. Thomas Dunne Books; 2010. Accessed October 24, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.503472
    • APA:
      Moody, D. (2010). Autumn (1st ed.). Thomas Dunne Books.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Moody, David. 2010. Autumn. 1st ed. Thomas Dunne Books. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.503472.
    • Harvard:
      Moody, D. (2010) Autumn. 1st ed. Thomas Dunne Books. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.503472 (Accessed: 24 October 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Moody, D 2010, Autumn, 1st ed., Thomas Dunne Books, viewed 24 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Moody, David. Autumn. 1st ed., Thomas Dunne Books, 2010. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.503472.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Moody, David. Autumn. 1st ed. Thomas Dunne Books, 2010. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.503472.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Moody D. Autumn [Internet]. 1st ed. Thomas Dunne Books; 2010 [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.503472

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2010 October #2

Originally self-published and offered as a free download, Moody's sluggish apocalyptic survival story follows three characters as they deal with the aftereffects of a virus that kills most of the population, then turns them into zombies. When the dead first rise, they are harmless and unresponsive, but eventually they regain their most basic senses and turn violent. Most survivors, having become accustomed to the undead being rather benign, are unprepared for this change and perish quickly (though regrettably off-page), but Michael, Carl, and Emma, barricaded in an isolated farmhouse, remain secure—for a little while. While the staged progression of the virus makes for an interesting premise, the execution is lacking, with excruciatingly slow pacing, repetitive dialogue, and characters as dull and aimless as the dead. While the story picks up around the 200-page mark, concluding with an exciting escape scene that leaves two of the characters' fates undecided, zombie fans may want to give this first in the Autumn series a pass and read Moody's superior Hater (2009) instead. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.

Booklist Reviews 2011 December #1

As Moody's Autumn series continues, it's been about a month and a half since a virus wiped out most of humanity and turned the dead into zombies—although the author doesn't use either the word zombie or most of the familiar tropes. A small group of men and women are holed up in a block of flats, barricaded against the lumbering dead. But their uneasy safety doesn't last, and eventually they're forced out into the open, where, rather coincidentally, they meet up with another band of survivors who seem to have made themselves a much more secure stronghold, until clashing personalities inside the compound threaten to put them all at risk. This is a crisply written novel (although it's not as visceral as Moody's Hater series, which tackles the zombie theme from a more violent angle) with well-defined characters and a palpable sense of creeping terror: these undead might be sluggish and easy to kill, but they also seem to be a lot smarter than anyone realizes. The novel ends on a terrifying, tragic note, promising a suitably horrific finale for the series. Copyright 2011 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2010 October #2

In under 24 hours, a contagion kills 99 percent of the human race. The immune few survivors only have a few days to pull together before the dead begin to rise again, at first just wandering catatonically, then gradually developing volition, but never aggression. The corpses present a danger because of their sheer numbers, and they are attracted to the slightest noise. This marks the first print publication of the novel; it's been available free online since 2001 and has a cult following. BZG The word zombie never appears in the story. [Library marketing; this is the first of a five-book series that will be republished by Thomas Dunne Books.—Ed.]

[Page 67]. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ BookSmack

The undead of Moody's popular "Autumn" series are unusual. They are never referred to as zombies, and they are not depicted as the evil, predatory cannibals so characteristic of zombie lit. Rather, these undead are diseased human beings who suffer from a debilitating condition. In the third installment, Purification, survivors from the previous book (Autumn: The City) are ensconced in an underground military base. The bodies amass on the surface, attracted by the commotion produced by the people underground. When the ventilation system becomes compromised by the milling crowd, soldiers are sent to fix the problem. The mission goes wrong, and the complex's inhabitants must run for their lives and find a new place to start rebuilding once again. In the fourth book, Disintegration, 40 days have passed since the outbreak, and the world's population has been decimated. The dead swarm everywhere, their decaying bodies deteriorating more each day. They have continued to become increasingly self-aware, violent, and regimented. A small group of survivors still endure through aggression and sheer ferocity. When their block of flats is breached by the dead, they flee and chance upon a hotel that appears to be an oasis of normality. Here, they encounter a second, very different group of people who have been using as survival tools intelligence and strategy instead of brute force. - "Books with Braaains" Booksmack! 9/15/11 Despite Moody's new take on the traditional monster, his elaborate descriptions of decaying corpses, rotting entrails, and foul bodily fluids leave no doubt about the genre of his novels. After a while these accounts become both repetitive and revolting. Nonetheless, Purification is certain to appeal to series fans as well as lovers of urban-military-zombie crossovers like Z.A. Recht's "Morningstar Strain" series and David Wellington's Monster Island. In Disintegration, the best installment, Moody ventures into Lord of the Flies territory. The juxtaposition of the two groups of survivors and the consequent tension between them produces excruciating suspense not seen before in the series. The ending is utterly chilling and seems quite final, although Moody's website indicates Autumn: Aftermath is in the works and will conclude the series. - "Books with Braaains" Booksmack! 9/15/11 (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ Reviews 2011 September #2

The undead of Moody's popular "Autumn" series are unusual. They are never referred to as zombies, and they are not depicted as the evil, predatory cannibals so characteristic of zombie lit. Rather, these undead are diseased human beings who suffer from a debilitating condition. In the third installment, Purification, survivors from the previous book (Autumn: The City) are ensconced in an underground military base. The bodies amass on the surface, attracted by the commotion produced by the people underground. When the ventilation system becomes compromised by the milling crowd, soldiers are sent to fix the problem. The mission goes wrong, and the complex's inhabitants must run for their lives and find a new place to start rebuilding once again. In the fourth book, Disintegration, 40 days have passed since the outbreak, and the world's population has been decimated. The dead swarm everywhere, their decaying bodies deteriorating more each day. They have continued to become increasingly self-aware, violent, and regimented. A small group of survivors still endure through aggression and sheer ferocity. When their block of flats is breached by the dead, they flee and chance upon a hotel that appears to be an oasis of normality. Here, they encounter a second, very different group of people who have been using as survival tools intelligence and strategy instead of brute force.

Despite Moody's new take on the traditional monster, his elaborate descriptions of decaying corpses, rotting entrails, and foul bodily fluids leave no doubt about the genre of his novels. After a while these accounts become both repetitive and revolting. Nonetheless, Purification is certain to appeal to series fans as well as lovers of urban-military-zombie crossovers like Z.A. Recht's "Morningstar Strain" series and David Wellington's Monster Island. In Disintegration, the best installment, Moody ventures into Lord of the Flies territory. The juxtaposition of the two groups of survivors and the consequent tension between them produces excruciating suspense not seen before in the series. The ending is utterly chilling and seems quite final, although Moody's website indicates Autumn: Aftermath is in the works and will conclude the series.

[Page 71]. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.