Stef Soto, taco queen / by Jennifer Torres.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: "Mexican-American Stef Soto is hoping to break free from her overprotective parents and embarrassing reputation from her family's taco truck business, but she soon learns that family, friendship, and the taco truck are important and wonderful parts of her life"-- Provided by publisher.
    • ISBN:
      9780316306867
      031630686X
    • Accession Number:
      2015036991
    • Accession Number:
      ocn944012915
      944012915
    • Accession Number:
      fay.514258
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      TORRES, J. Stef Soto, taco queen. First edition. [s. l.]: Little, Brown and Company, 2017. ISBN 9780316306867. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.514258. Acesso em: 26 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Torres J. Stef Soto, Taco Queen. First edition. Little, Brown and Company; 2017. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.514258
    • APA:
      Torres, J. (2017). Stef Soto, taco queen (First edition.). Little, Brown and Company.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Torres, Jennifer. 2017. Stef Soto, Taco Queen. First edition. Little, Brown and Company. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.514258.
    • Harvard:
      Torres, J. (2017) Stef Soto, taco queen. First edition. Little, Brown and Company. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.514258 (Accessed: 26 September 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Torres, J 2017, Stef Soto, taco queen, First edition., Little, Brown and Company, viewed 26 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Torres, Jennifer. Stef Soto, Taco Queen. First edition., Little, Brown and Company, 2017. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.514258.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Torres, Jennifer. Stef Soto, Taco Queen. First edition. Little, Brown and Company, 2017. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.514258.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Torres J. Stef Soto, taco queen [Internet]. First edition. Little, Brown and Company; 2017 [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.514258

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2016 November #1

Stef Soto is tired of feeling babied by her parents, and she's especially tired of being known as the Taco Queen because of her dad's food truck, called Tía Perla. She wants them to give her a little more freedom, but she's having trouble working out how to prove she's mature enough. When her family's livelihood is threatened by new food truck codes, Stef wants to speak out in defense of Tía Perla, but she's not quite sure where to begin. This cheery, relatable story features short and sweet chapters with plenty of Spanish words and phrases sprinkled in and a cheer-worthy main character in Stef, a happy, funny girl who adores art above all. It's her outlet for everything she feels, and when she finally realizes how her love of art can help her parents' business, she also learns how to better communicate her feelings and needs. While the tone here is often lighthearted, this will also be relevant to any kid whose parents have moved to another country to seek a better life. Copyright 2016 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2017 Fall

When new regulations threaten to shut down her father's unsightly food truck, Tma Perla, Stef at first thinks it isn't the worst thing in the world. Torres captures what it's like to be a young person seeking independence and breathes life into the old food truck, which becomes another character. Young readers will feel a kinship with Stef in this engaging and relatable novel. Copyright 2017 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2017 #4

Estefania "Stef" Soto wants nothing more than for her parents to stop treating her like she's a little kid. That means letting her walk home from school alone instead of having her dad pick her up in her family's unsightly food truck, Tía Perla (which ex-best friend Julia Sandoval has convinced her makes her smell like tacos). It also means allowing her to go to the Viviana Vega concert that everyone in the entire world is attending. When new regulations threaten to shut down her father's business, Stef thinks it isn't the worst thing in the world. No Tía Perla means no food truck waiting for her after school and maybe even some freedom from her overprotective parents. But when a power failure almost ruins the school's fundraiser, Stef realizes that Tía Perla might not put such a cramp in her style after all. Torres perfectly captures what it's like to be a young person seeking independence and learning about responsibility. She breathes life into the old food truck, which becomes another character. We meet her in the school parking lot: "Tía Perla, huffing and wheezing and looking a little bit grubby no matter how clean she actually is." Young readers will feel a kinship with Stef as she struggles to spread her wings in this engaging and relatable middle-grade novel about growing up. celia c. pérez Copyright 2017 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

PW Reviews 2016 November #1

The bones of this polished debut are familiar—overprotective parents, seventh-grade social struggles—but Torres fleshes them out with authenticity, humor, and heart. The only child of immigrant parents, Stef is embarrassed by her father's rundown taco truck, Tía Perla, which he considers part of the family; after helping Papi serve customers, Stef watches as he locks the vehicle's kitchen door "and gives it a quick tap—the way you might congratulate an old friend with a pat on the back." Tía Perla plays a key role in the development of both the plot and Stef's character: her growing self-confidence helps her deflect ongoing mean-spirited comments about the truck from her onetime friend Julia, she summons the courage to speak up at a meeting debating regulations that could put her father and other mobile food vendors out of business, and she uses Tía Perla to save the class dance during a power outage. Stef's fresh, honest voice will resonate with a broad swath of readers, as will the relatable struggles she negotiates. Ages 8–12. Agent: Jennifer Laughran, Andrea Brown Literary. (Jan.) Copyright 2016 Publisher Weekly.