The March against fear : the last great walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black power / Ann Bausum.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Mississippi. 1966. On a hot June afternoon, an African-American man named James Meredith set out to walk through his home state, intending to fight racism and fear with his feet. A seemingly simple plan, but one teeming with risk. Just one day later Meredith was shot and wounded in a roadside ambush. Within twenty-four hours, Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokely Carmichael, and other civil rights leaders had taken up Meredith's cause, determined to overcome this violent act and complete Meredith's walk. The stakes were high -- there was no time for advance planning and their route cut through dangerous territory. No one knew if they would succeed. By many measures, the March Against Fear became one of the greatest protests of the civil rights era. But it was also one of the last, and the campaign has been largely forgotten.
    • Content Notes:
      A tremor -- Wild ideas -- Reactions -- Revived -- Delta bound -- Black power -- Earthquake -- White rage -- Supremacy -- Reunited -- Finale -- Aftershocks.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (pages 133-135) and index.
      Ages 12 and up.
    • Other Titles:
      Last great walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black power.
    • ISBN:
      9781426326653
      1426326653
      9781426326660
      1426326661
    • Accession Number:
      2016027880
    • Accession Number:
      ocn951833398
      951833398
    • Accession Number:
      fay.520398
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BAUSUM, A. The March against fear : the last great walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black power. [s. l.]: National Geographic, 2017. ISBN 9781426326653. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.520398. Acesso em: 18 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Bausum A. The March against Fear : The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power. National Geographic; 2017. Accessed September 18, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.520398
    • APA:
      Bausum, A. (2017). The March against fear : the last great walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black power. National Geographic.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Bausum, Ann. 2017. The March against Fear : The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power. National Geographic. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.520398.
    • Harvard:
      Bausum, A. (2017) The March against fear : the last great walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black power. National Geographic. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.520398 (Accessed: 18 September 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Bausum, A 2017, The March against fear : the last great walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black power, National Geographic, viewed 18 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Bausum, Ann. The March against Fear : The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power. National Geographic, 2017. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.520398.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Bausum, Ann. The March against Fear : The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power. National Geographic, 2017. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.520398.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Bausum A. The March against fear : the last great walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black power [Internet]. National Geographic; 2017 [cited 2020 Sep 18]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.520398

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2016 December #1

Ask typical high-school students about the American civil rights movement, and many will mention Martin Luther King Jr. and his "I Have a Dream" speech. What they may not be so familiar with are the other influential individuals and momentous events that shaped the cause. This account of 1966's 200-mile freedom march from Memphis to Jackson, Mississippi, written in accessible language and peppered with quotes and period photos that bring the action alive, tells how this momentous effort, initiated by James Meredith, united the five factions of the civil rights movement: the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; the Congress of Racial Equality; the National Urban League; the NAACP; and Stokely Carmichael of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Chronological coverage conveys the fear and danger participants faced and documents Carmichael's first use of the term black power. The brief chapters build on one another, creating a complete picture for readers with limited background knowledge. This compelling account will be equally engaging for classroom resource material or individual research. Copyright 2016 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2017 Fall

The lesser-known March Against Fear, James Meredith's 1966 quest to empower blacks in Mississippi, grew into a larger movement when major civil rights organizations such as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference joined in; the term "black power" emerged during it as a rallying cry. Clear writing and excellent use of powerful quotes and photographs make this an engrossing--and important--read. Bib., ind. Copyright 2017 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

PW Reviews 2016 November #1

In a powerful and timely book, Bausum (Stonewall) focuses her attention on the last great march of the civil rights era, the March Against Fear, from Memphis, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., in June 1966. Initiated by James Meredith in an effort to make Mississippi a less fearful place for black Americans, the march swelled to 15,000 people and resulted in 4,000 black Mississippian voter registrations; it also splintered the major civil rights organizations of the day and gave rise to Stokely Carmichael's Black Power movement. Bausum dissects these internal divisions with great sensitivity, lauding Martin Luther King Jr.'s peacemaking powers while illuminating the conditions that provoked others to more confrontational protest. Abundant details disclose the extent of segregation and racism, the pivotal role of law enforcement authorities, and how fraught protecting the marchers could be: state troopers used tear gas and physical assault to "suppress an act of racial defiance" when marchers tried to pitch their tents on public land. This exemplary look into civil rights history concludes with perspective and encouragement regarding ongoing struggles for social change. Archival photos and source notes are included. Ages 12–up. (Jan.) Copyright 2016 Publisher Weekly.