Moonstone : the boy who never was / Sjón ; translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First American edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Reykjavik, 1918. The eruptions of the Katla volcano darken the sky night and day. Yet despite the natural disaster, the shortage of coal and the Great War still raging in the outside world, life in the small capital goes on as always. Sixteen-year-old Mani Steinn lives for the movies. Awake, he lives on the fringes of society. Asleep, he dreams in pictures, the threads of his own life weaving through the tapestry of the films he loves. When the Spanish flu epidemic comes ashore, killing hundreds of townspeople and forcing thousands to their sick beds, the shadows that linger at the edges of existence grow darker and Mani is forced to re-evaluate both the society around him and his role in it. Evoking the moment when Iceland's saga culture met the new narrative form of the cinema and when the isolated island became swept up in global events, this is the story of a misfit transformed by his experiences in a world where life and death, reality and imagination, secrets and revelations jostle for dominance.
    • Notes:
      Originally published in 2013.
      Translated from the Icelandic.
    • Other Titles:
      Mánasteinn: drengurinn sem aldrei var til. English
    • ISBN:
      9780374212438
      0374212430
    • Accession Number:
      2015037595
    • Accession Number:
      ocn928750518
      928750518
    • Accession Number:
      fay.523425
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SJÓN; CRIBB, V. Moonstone : the boy who never was. First American edition. [s. l.]: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2016. ISBN 9780374212438. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.523425. Acesso em: 5 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Sjón, Cribb V. Moonstone : The Boy Who Never Was. First American edition. Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 2016. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.523425. Accessed July 5, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      Sjón, Cribb V. Moonstone : The Boy Who Never Was. First American edition. Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 2016. Accessed July 5, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.523425
    • APA:
      Sjón, & Cribb, V. (2016). Moonstone : the boy who never was (First American edition.). Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Sjón, and Victoria Cribb. 2016. Moonstone : The Boy Who Never Was. First American edition. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.523425.
    • Harvard:
      Sjón and Cribb, V. (2016) Moonstone : the boy who never was. First American edition. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.523425 (Accessed: 5 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Sjón & Cribb, V 2016, Moonstone : the boy who never was, First American edition., Farrar, Straus and Giroux, viewed 5 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Sjón, and Victoria Cribb. Moonstone : The Boy Who Never Was. First American edition., Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2016. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.523425.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Sjón, and Victoria Cribb. Moonstone : The Boy Who Never Was. First American edition. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2016. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.523425.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Sjón, Cribb V. Moonstone : the boy who never was [Internet]. First American edition. Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 2016 [cited 2020 Jul 5]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.523425

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2016 July #1

The latest book by Sjón (The Blue Fox, 2013), an Icelandic writer and lyricist for Björk, is a concise, magical, and elegiac novel set over several turbulent months in Iceland in 1918. At age 16, Máni Steinn, who is gay and a sometime hustler, is obsessed with two things: the beautiful, motorcycle-driving Sóla G and the movies. With little family, except for a great-aunt with whom he shares an apartment, Máni spends his days loafing about and taking in the new films at sleepy Reykjavík's two theaters. As the volcano Katla rumbles in the background, and Europe is engulfed in war, the Spanish influenza arrives, upending Máni's world. By the novel's end, a decimated Iceland becomes a sovereign state, while Máni himself gains a type of independence as well. A coda set a decade later provides a satisfying close to the novel, connecting Máni's story to the present and rewriting a bit of Iceland's history. Sjón is a minimalist genius, achieving so much with so little. And this work is brilliantly translated. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

PW Reviews 2016 June #1

A long-time collaborator with Björk, Sjón is an Icelandic writer, poet, and musician with a cult following. His latest work to be translated into English opens with a sex scene that sent ripples across his homeland upon release and sets the tone for a story both tender and explicit. Set in Reykjavik in 1918 as the Spanish flu runs rampant, this short, impressionistic work follows Máni Steinn, a cinema-obsessed 16-year-old boy who turns tricks for older men passing through his provincial city, and Sola G, a motorcycle-driving girl who infatuates him. As the epidemic's death toll rises, and his beloved movie theater is shuttered, Máni is employed by Dr. Garibaldi Árnason to assist in the physician's visits with the dying, while Sola is the driver. After Máni is imprisoned for having sex with a Danish sailor, the pace of the novel quickens and its stakes heighten. This is not a vast historical epic in the mode of Hilary Mantel; the characters and settings are vaguely sketched. But the prose is full of striking and poetic scenes, such as a silent film screened without musical accompaniment because all the musicians have died of influenza: "it becomes apparent just how silent these films really are." This novel resonates both as an allegory about society and sex, as well as a historical glimpse of a time when pandemic and war pressed upon Iceland from the south. (Aug.)

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