One doctor : close calls, cold cases, and the mysteries of medicine / Brendan Reilly.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st Atria books hardcover ed.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: "A first-person narrative that takes readers inside the medical profession as one doctor solves real-life medical mysteries"--Provided by publisher.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Reilly takes us to the front lines of medicine today. As his patients and their families survive close calls, struggle with heartrending decisions, and confront the limits of medicine's power to cure, he lays bare a fragmented, depersonalized, business-driven health-care system where real caring is hard to find. Reilly provides a hopeful, inspiring account of medicine's potential to improve people's lives, his own quest to understand the "truth" about doctoring, and a moving testament to the difference one doctor can make.
    • Content Notes:
      Now. Lost and found ; Caught in the middle ; A safe bet ; What's the plan? -- Then. An end ; The postman rings twice ; Lost marbles -- Now. Never say never ; To the limit ; Go gentle.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references and index.
    • ISBN:
      9781476726298
      1476726299
      9781476726366
      1476726361
    • Accession Number:
      2013006739
    • Accession Number:
      ocn828176224
      828176224
    • Accession Number:
      fay.526771
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      REILLY, B. M. One doctor : close calls, cold cases, and the mysteries of medicine. 1st Atria books hardcover ed. [s. l.]: Atria Books, 2013. ISBN 9781476726298. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.526771. Acesso em: 29 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Reilly BM. One Doctor : Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine. 1st Atria books hardcover ed. Atria Books; 2013. Accessed October 29, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.526771
    • APA:
      Reilly, B. M. (2013). One doctor : close calls, cold cases, and the mysteries of medicine (1st Atria books hardcover ed.). Atria Books.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Reilly, Brendan M. 2013. One Doctor : Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine. 1st Atria books hardcover ed. Atria Books. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.526771.
    • Harvard:
      Reilly, B. M. (2013) One doctor : close calls, cold cases, and the mysteries of medicine. 1st Atria books hardcover ed. Atria Books. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.526771 (Accessed: 29 October 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Reilly, BM 2013, One doctor : close calls, cold cases, and the mysteries of medicine, 1st Atria books hardcover ed., Atria Books, viewed 29 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Reilly, Brendan M. One Doctor : Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine. 1st Atria books hardcover ed., Atria Books, 2013. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.526771.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Reilly, Brendan M. One Doctor : Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine. 1st Atria books hardcover ed. Atria Books, 2013. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.526771.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Reilly BM. One doctor : close calls, cold cases, and the mysteries of medicine [Internet]. 1st Atria books hardcover ed. Atria Books; 2013 [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.526771

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2013 September #2

Reilly's medical narrative nicely intertwines true stories of challenging patients—­difficult diagnoses, tough medical and ethical decisions, and the management of critically ill people—with valuable lessons on doctoring and patienthood. A fever of unknown origin, profound thyroid deficiency, severe hypoglycemia, chest pain, delirium, bleeding bladder cancer, and life-threatening infection of a heart valve are some of the medical problems encountered. Reilly, a hospital physician with 40 years of experience, also recounts caring for his elderly parents. He writes about the importance of grunt work in medicine, sustained doctor-patient relationships, and clinical instinct. The doctor confesses, Over the years I've learned to listen to my gut, but that doesn't mean I can trust it. Indeed, medical decision making can be hard and hazardous. Risk and probability always factor into it. A medical problem can be handled in multiple ways, but outcomes are never guaranteed. Benefit and harm are both possibilities. Reilly admits that physicians know lots about regret but rarely discuss it. Empathy and thoughtfulness—One Doctor has oodles of it. Copyright 2013 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2013 March #2

Executive vice chair of medicine at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, Reilly here portrays moments of medical drama while focusing on one symbolic case. Friend and patient Fred, an engineer whose invention included the navigational device removed from Amelia Earhart's plane before her last flight, died shortly after he claimed to see angels.

[Page 92]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PW Reviews 2013 July #2

He was chair of medicine at Chicago's Cook County Hospital, on which the hit TV show ER was based, and Reilly—now at New York–Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center—matches the heart-pounding pace and drama of that fictional show in this remarkable memoir. Reilly painstakingly relates his most challenging cases, beginning in the present—when he sees 19 ER patients on an average day—before backtracking to his early career at Dartmouth in 1985. That year, Reilly struggled to identify the cause of an eccentric and lovable patient's delirium. By the time he figured it out, the patient—Fred—had died. "ealth providers still feel guilty when things go wrong," Reilly notes of that troubling cold case, but he insists it made him a better doctor. After all, harm is inherent in the pathway to healing: "in a brave new post-Hippocratic world, medicine's venerable first principle had become an empty shibboleth.... First, do no harm?... If we didn't do harm, we couldn't do good." It's a sobering reminder that though medicine is a science, it is not an exact one. Fast-forwarding to today, Reilly describes another wrenching struggle: making end-of-life decisions with his own elderly mother. But his book is about more than the joy of saving lives and the sadness of losing them—it's an intimate exploration of modern medicine and the human condition. Agent: Janis A. Donnaud, Janis A. Donnaud and Associates. (Sept. 3)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC