Us, in progress : short stories about young Latinos / Lulu Delacre.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
  Processing Request
Share on Goodreads
  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: A collection of short stories featuring Latin Americans allows readers to experience life through their eyes, celebrate their victories, and see their hardships.
    • Content Notes:
      The attack -- Selfie -- Güera -- Burrito man -- Band-aid -- Firstborn -- Cubano two -- Peacemaker -- The secret -- Pickup soccer -- Saturday school -- 90,000 children.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references.
    • Other Titles:
      Short stories. Selections
    • ISBN:
      9780062392145
      006239214X
    • Accession Number:
      on1001808960
      1001808960
    • Accession Number:
      fay.540840
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      DELACRE, L. Us, in progress : short stories about young Latinos. [s. l.]: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017. ISBN 9780062392145. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.540840. Acesso em: 5 dez. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Delacre L. Us, in Progress : Short Stories about Young Latinos. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers; 2017. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.540840. Accessed December 5, 2019.
    • APA:
      Delacre, L. (2017). Us, in progress : short stories about young Latinos. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.540840
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Delacre, Lulu. 2017. Us, in Progress : Short Stories about Young Latinos. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.540840.
    • Harvard:
      Delacre, L. (2017) Us, in progress : short stories about young Latinos. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.540840 (Accessed: 5 December 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Delacre, L 2017, Us, in progress : short stories about young Latinos, Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, viewed 5 December 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Delacre, Lulu. Us, in Progress : Short Stories about Young Latinos. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.540840.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Delacre, Lulu. Us, in Progress : Short Stories about Young Latinos. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.540840.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Delacre L. Us, in progress : short stories about young Latinos [Internet]. Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers; 2017 [cited 2019 Dec 5]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.540840

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2017 July #1

*Starred Review* Three-time Pura Belpré Award honoree Delacre offers up 12 short stories, beautifully written with candor, honesty, and perfect brevity, that explore what it means to be a Latinx in the U.S. today. These finely wrought and uniformly well-written stories, many based on true incidents, portray the wide range of cultural and geographic diversity within the Latinx community. They feature both male and female main characters and cover topics such as police abuse, the prevalence of prediabetes in the Latinx population, and the misconception that all Latinos are dark-skinned and poor. Many of the stories deal with community dynamics—how an unassuming member can make an indelible impression, Saturday school language classes, and bullying and family dysfunction—while others address larger social issues, such as guardianship related to deportation and immigration, unaccompanied minors crossing borders, and the 2012 DREAM Act. Delacre illustrates as well, providing a gorgeous mixed-media portrait of each story's main character, and a glossary of Spanish words and phrases, organized by story, concludes the book. Delacre's lyrical writing perfectly expresses what the characters are experiencing, and each story's ending is honest and satisfying, if sometimes open-ended—much like real life. A collection not to be missed. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2018 Spring

Twelve tales based on true events are appended with explanatory notes and citations of the articles that informed them. The deliberate voice and close focus on each fictionalized protagonist turns each headline into a relatable story. Intricate mixed-media character portraits by the author, purposely unfinished, accompany the stories. An intimate and varied look into what it's like to be young and Latino in the U.S. today. Glos. Copyright 2017 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2017 #5

This collection opens with "The Attack," an all-too-timely account of a young Latino man with a disability being mistreated by the police. The twelve tales are all based on true events, appended with notes that explain where Delacre first learned of them and citing the article that informed each piece. The deliberate voice and close focus on each fictionalized protagonist turns each headline into a relatable story. At the beginning of each tale, Delacre includes intricate mixed-media character portraits, purposely unfinished, pencil drawings layered between pierced rice paper and incorporating newspaper clippings from her original sources. She also pairs each story with a refran; these sayings are translated in the back matter, which also includes a glossary of Spanish terms. The collection presents stories about health (in "Selfie," Marla attempts to improve her pre-diabetic condition through cycling); about young people feeling shame over their parents' jobs ("Burrito Man"); parents being deported ("Band-Aid"); and siblings who are undocumented ("The Secret"). In contrast, in "90,000 Children," a twelve-year-old Latino boy aspires to be a Border Patrol agent. Delacre's collection challenges existing misconceptions by giving readers an intimate and varied look into what it is like to be young and Latino in the United States today. sonia alejandra rodriguez Copyright 2017 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

PW Reviews 2017 May #5

In this timely collection of 12 stories, Delacre (Alicia Afterimage) offers an inside look at being a Latino today in the United States. Rendered in straightforward prose, the stories focus on tweens and young adolescents from a variety of cultures, including Mexico, Cuba, and Puerto Rico. The collection goes beyond expected subjects like the Dream Act and deportation to less talked-about ones: fair-haired, fair-skinned Vicky feels ostracized from her own culture; 13-year-old Marla battles back against her family's tendency towards diabetes; and Luci finally stands up to a lifetime of bullying by her older sister. Back matter includes translations of the Spanish words, phrases, and refranes (Spanish sayings) that appear throughout, as well as notes on the source material and inspirations for each story. While these tales offer a broad range of perspectives, the storylines often chart predictable courses, and the characters aren't always distinctive as individuals. The book's most compelling element may be Delacre's accompanying artwork, evocative mixed-media portraits of the protagonists that look like they could step off the page. Ages 8–12. (Aug.)

Copyright 2017 Publisher Weekly.