Pack of two : the intricate bond between people and dogs / Caroline Knapp.

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  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      KNAPP, C. Pack of two : the intricate bond between people and dogs. [s. l.]: Dial Press, 1998. ISBN 0385316984. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.54767. Acesso em: 22 fev. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Knapp C. Pack of Two : The Intricate Bond between People and Dogs. Dial Press; 1998. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.54767. Accessed February 22, 2020.
    • APA:
      Knapp, C. (1998). Pack of two : the intricate bond between people and dogs. Dial Press.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Knapp, Caroline. 1998. Pack of Two : The Intricate Bond between People and Dogs. Dial Press. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.54767.
    • Harvard:
      Knapp, C. (1998) Pack of two : the intricate bond between people and dogs. Dial Press. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.54767 (Accessed: 22 February 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Knapp, C 1998, Pack of two : the intricate bond between people and dogs, Dial Press, viewed 22 February 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Knapp, Caroline. Pack of Two : The Intricate Bond between People and Dogs. Dial Press, 1998. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.54767.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Knapp, Caroline. Pack of Two : The Intricate Bond between People and Dogs. Dial Press, 1998. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.54767.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Knapp C. Pack of two : the intricate bond between people and dogs [Internet]. Dial Press; 1998 [cited 2020 Feb 22]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.54767

Reviews

LJ Reviews 1998 May

This is a book about relationships. Although the main focus is on the intensity of the bonds formed between humans and their dogs, the author also provides insight into the intricacies of relationships between people. Knapp is the critically acclaimed author of Drinking: A Love Story (LJ 7/96), where she tells of her struggle with and recovery from alcohol addiction. Her honest and eloquent writing style is equally evident in this new book, where she talks of forging a relationship with a mixed-breed puppy. Loving a dog, she asserts, is refreshingly honest and simple. The dog does not play emotional games but offers unconditional love and unflagging loyalty. Dog ownership opens up a new world, with different responsibilities, new interests, and a host of new human acquaintances and can have a tremendous impact on the owner's life. Readers who share their lives with dogs will find themselves nodding and smiling as they read about Knapp's experiences with her own dog and her descriptions of friends and their canine companions. A well-written and enjoyable read for all dog lovers, this book may be especially pertinent for those with an interest in pet therapy.?Deborah Emerson, Monroe Community Coll., Rochester, NY Copyright 1998 Cahners Business Information.

PW Reviews 1998 April #3

Following her bestselling memoir, Drinking: A Love Story, Knapp's account of her "mutual and unambiguous and exceptionally private" relationship with Lucille, a small German shepherd mix, illuminates beautifully how the dog's unconditional love filled the gaping hole in Knapp's emotional life after her parents died and she quit drinking. Drawing on charming but alpha-tough anecdotes from her own experience and those of her dog-loving friends (primarily single and female), Knapp describes with affectionate amusement the great, often expensive lengths to which owners go to insure that their pets are well trained and well balanced. As a pup, Lucille goes with Knapp to obedience school for education, to day care for baby-sitting and to play dates with other dogs for recreation. They visit dog psychics and therapists to explain mysterious, troubled behavior, and a canine behaviorist for a few weeks of discipline. Throughout, Knapp has a canny nose for emotional detail: "Living with a dog is like being followed around 24 hours a day by a mute psychoanalyst," Knapp writes. "Feelings float up from inside and attach themselves to the dog, who will not question their validity, or hold up your behavior to scrutiny, or challenge your perceptions." Lucille's arrival is followed by boyfriend Michael's departure, and Knapp intelligently plumbs criticism from outside the dog world that she and others "use their pets as surrogates, to retreat into the world of animals in order to bypass more problematic and complex human relationships." Anyone who loves dogs, and particularly prospective first-time owners, will delight in this exploration of man's (or in this case, woman's) best friend and of the "significant other" role a dog often plays in a one-person household. First serial to Glamour. (June)

PW Reviews 1998 April #4

Following her bestselling memoir, Drinking: A Love Story, Knapp's account of her "mutual and unambiguous and exceptionally private" relationship with Lucille, a small German shepherd mix, illuminates beautifully how the dog's unconditional love filled the gaping hole in Knapp's emotional life after her parents died and she quit drinking. Drawing on charming but alpha-tough anecdotes from her own experience and those of her dog-loving friends (primarily single and female), Knapp describes with affectionate amusement the great, often expensive lengths to which owners go to insure that their pets are well trained and well balanced. As a pup, Lucille goes with Knapp to obedience school for education, to day care for baby-sitting and to play dates with other dogs for recreation. They visit dog psychics and therapists to explain mysterious, troubled behavior, and a canine behaviorist for a few weeks of discipline. Throughout, Knapp has a canny nose for emotional detail: "Living with a dog is like being followed around 24 hours a day by a mute psychoanalyst," Knapp writes. "Feelings float up from inside and attach themselves to the dog, who will not question their validity, or hold up your behavior to scrutiny, or challenge your perceptions." Lucille's arrival is followed by boyfriend Michael's departure, and Knapp intelligently plumbs criticism from outside the dog world that she and others "use their pets as surrogates, to retreat into the world of animals in order to bypass more problematic and complex human relationships." Anyone who loves dogs, and particularly prospective first-time owners, will delight in this exploration of man's (or in this case, woman's) best friend and of the "significant other" role a dog often plays in a one-person household. First serial to Glamour. (June) Copyright 1998 Publishers Weekly Reviews