The day you begin / Jacqueline Woodson ; illustrated by Rafael López.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Other students laugh when Rigoberto, an immigrant from Venezuela, introduces himself but later, he meets Angelina and discovers that he is not the only one who feels like an outsider.
    • ISBN:
      9780399246531
      0399246533
    • Accession Number:
      2017059887
    • Accession Number:
      on1014366779
      1014366779
    • Accession Number:
      fay.579248
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      WOODSON, J.; LÓPEZ, R. The day you begin. [s.l.] : Nancy Paulsen Books, 2018. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15 nov. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Woodson J, López R. The Day You Begin. Nancy Paulsen Books; 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.579248. Accessed November 15, 2019.
    • APA:
      Woodson, J., & López, R. (2018). The day you begin. Nancy Paulsen Books. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.579248
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Woodson, Jacqueline, and Rafael López. 2018. The Day You Begin. Nancy Paulsen Books. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.579248.
    • Harvard:
      Woodson, J. and López, R. (2018) The day you begin. Nancy Paulsen Books. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.579248 (Accessed: 15 November 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Woodson, J & López, R 2018, The day you begin, Nancy Paulsen Books, viewed 15 November 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Woodson, Jacqueline, and Rafael López. The Day You Begin. Nancy Paulsen Books, 2018. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.579248.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Woodson, Jacqueline, and Rafael López. The Day You Begin. Nancy Paulsen Books, 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.579248.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Woodson J, López R. The day you begin [Internet]. Nancy Paulsen Books; 2018 [cited 2019 Nov 15]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.579248

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2018 August #1

A girl with honey-brown skin and curly hair waits outside a classroom: "There will be times when you walk into a room and no one there is quite like you." The omniscient narrator continues that sometimes others won't understand your words or might turn up their noses at your lunch. But then a small thing—say, you and a classmate have siblings who share the same name—changes everything up. Woodson catches the uncertainty, even fear, that comes with new situations. But her lyrical language also captures the moment when confidence sparks and friendships are born. In one instance, the girl feels different because her classmates have brought souvenirs from their travels to France, India, and South Carolina, while she stayed home and read books. Of course, books can take you anywhere, a point well made, though not all readers will relate to the idea of far-flung travel. The bold, bright artwork features a diverse cast of kids, all with huge eyes. The important message plays out in a striking design that mixes the everyday with flights of fancy. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Woodson, a recent National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, is one of kidlit's brightest stars, and this should find lots of eager hands. Preschool-Grade 1. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2019 Spring

Venezuelan immigrant Rigoberto looks crestfallen when the class laughs at his name; other classmates feel left out when friends make fun of their lunch foods. And the (unnamed) African American protagonist has trouble finding her voice when her classmates recount their summer vacations until she realizes books have afforded her boundless travel. Woodson's story about feeling like an outcast values literacy, reading, and imagination. Lspez's illustrations feature vivid, brilliant colors. Copyright 2018 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2018 #5

What will it take for a child who feels different to share her stories? Woodson's picture book, told in second-person and (mostly) future tense, tells readers that sometimes they will feel like outcasts: "There will be times when you walk into a room and no one there is quite like you." The classroom of a young African American girl with a big, curly afro is such a place. The girl's new classmate Rigoberto, recently moved from Venezuela, looks crestfallen when the class laughs at his name, but he recovers when his teacher makes his "name and homeland sound like flowers blooming the first bright notes of a song." Other students feel left out when friends make fun of their lunch foods as "strange" and "unfamiliar," or when no one chooses them for playground games. The story keeps returning to the original African American protagonist, who has trouble finding her voice when others recount their summer vacations full of domestic and international travel; she had to babysit her sister all summer. She finally realizes that the books she has read and shared with her sister have afforded her boundless travel. Like Woodson's memoir for older readers Brown Girl Dreaming (rev. 9/14), this story places great value on literacy, reading, and imagination. The matte-finished pages feature illustrations in vivid, brilliant colors, with repeated appearances of flying birds and lush, twining vines and flowers. michelle h. martin Copyright 2018 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

PW Reviews 2018 June #2

Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming) imagines being "an only" in the classroom—what it's like to be the only one with an accent ("No one understands the way words curl from your mouth"), the only one who stayed home during summer vacation ("What good is this/ when other students were flying/ and sailing"), the only one whose lunch box is filled with food "too strange or too unfamiliar for others to love as you do." Without prescribing sympathy, Woodson's poetic lines give power to each child's experience. She describes the moment when the girl who didn't go on vacation speaks her truth, her "voice stronger than it was a minute ago." She has cared for her sister all summer, she tells her classmates, reading and telling stories: "Even though we were right on our block it was like/ we got to go EVERYWHERE." And "all at once" in the seconds after sharing one's story, something shifts, common ground is revealed, and "the world opens itself up a little wider/ to make some space for you." López (Drum Dream Girl) paints the book's array of children as students in the same classroom; patterns and colors on the children's clothing and the growing things around them fill the spreads with life. Woodson's gentle, lilting story and López's artistry create a stirring portrait of the courage it takes to be oneself: "There will be times when you walk into a room and no one there is quite like you until the day you begin/ to share your stories." Ages 5–8. Author's agent: Kathleen Nishimoto, William Morris Endeavor. Illustrator's agent: Stefanie Von Borstel, Full Circle. (Aug.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.