The curse of bigness : antitrust in the new Gilded Age / Tim Wu.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: "We live in an age of extreme corporate concentration, in which global industries are controlled by just a few giant firms -- big banks, big pharma, and big tech, just to name a few. But concern over what Louis Brandeis called the "curse of bigness" can no longer remain the province of specialist lawyers and economists, for it has spilled over into policy and politics, even threatening democracy itself. History suggests that tolerance of inequality and failing to control excessive corporate power may prompt the rise of populism, nationalism, extremist politicians, and fascist regimes. In short, as Wu warns, we are in grave danger of repeating the signature errors of the twentieth century. In The Curse of Bigness, Columbia professor Tim Wu tells of how figures like Brandeis and Theodore Roosevelt first confronted the democratic threats posed by the great trusts of the Gilded Age--but the lessons of the Progressive Era were forgotten in the last 40 years. He calls for recovering the lost tenets of the trustbusting age as part of a broader revival of American progressive ideas as we confront the fallout of persistent and extreme economic inequality."--Amazon.com.
    • Content Notes:
      The monopolization movement -- The right to live, and not merely to exist -- The Trustbuster -- Peak antitrust and the Chicago School -- The last of the big cases -- Chicago triumphant -- The rise of the tech trusts -- Conclusion : A neo-Brandeisian agenda.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references.
    • ISBN:
      9780999745465
      0999745468
    • Accession Number:
      2018949786
    • Accession Number:
      on1029205194
      1029205194
    • Accession Number:
      fay.590147
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      WU, T. The curse of bigness : antitrust in the new Gilded Age. [s.l.] : Columbia Global Reports, 2018. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 18 ago. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Wu T. The Curse of Bigness : Antitrust in the New Gilded Age. Columbia Global Reports; 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.590147. Accessed August 18, 2019.
    • APA:
      Wu, T. (2018). The curse of bigness : antitrust in the new Gilded Age. Columbia Global Reports. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.590147
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Wu, Tim. 2018. The Curse of Bigness : Antitrust in the New Gilded Age. Columbia Global Reports. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.590147.
    • Harvard:
      Wu, T. (2018) The curse of bigness : antitrust in the new Gilded Age. Columbia Global Reports. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.590147 (Accessed: 18 August 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Wu, T 2018, The curse of bigness : antitrust in the new Gilded Age, Columbia Global Reports, viewed 18 August 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Wu, Tim. The Curse of Bigness : Antitrust in the New Gilded Age. Columbia Global Reports, 2018. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.590147.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Wu, Tim. The Curse of Bigness : Antitrust in the New Gilded Age. Columbia Global Reports, 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.590147.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Wu T. The curse of bigness : antitrust in the new Gilded Age [Internet]. Columbia Global Reports; 2018 [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.590147

Reviews

PW Reviews 2018 September #4

In this short but persuasive book, Wu (The Attention Merchants), a Columbia law professor, connects the current political climate to a decline in antitrust enforcement. From the rise of U.S. Steel and Standard Oil through the "trust-busting" days of Teddy Roosevelt, Wu shows how antitrust laws, as championed by Louis Brandeis (who coined the term "the curse of bigness"), once functioned as a check on private power. In the modern era, however, enforcement has steadily declined; the George W. Bush administration did not bring a single antitrust action in eight years. The results, Wu argues, are a widening income gap and corporations subverting electoral politics. In the 20th century, he writes, "nations that failed to control private power and attend to the needs of their citizens faced the rise of strongmen who promised a more immediate deliverance from economic woes." The book's brevity is an asset—Wu skillfully avoids economic and legal rabbit holes, keeping the book laser-focused on his thesis: that antitrust enforcement must be restored "as a check on power as necessary in a functioning democracy before it's too late." Persuasive and brilliantly written, the book is especially timely given the rise of trillion-dollar tech companies. (Nov.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.

PW Reviews 2018 September #4

In this short but persuasive book, Wu (The Attention Merchants), a Columbia law professor, connects the current political climate to a decline in antitrust enforcement. From the rise of U.S. Steel and Standard Oil through the "trust-busting" days of Teddy Roosevelt, Wu shows how antitrust laws, as championed by Louis Brandeis (who coined the term "the curse of bigness"), once functioned as a check on private power. In the modern era, however, enforcement has steadily declined; the George W. Bush administration did not bring a single antitrust action in eight years. The results, Wu argues, are a widening income gap and corporations subverting electoral politics. In the 20th century, he writes, "nations that failed to control private power and attend to the needs of their citizens faced the rise of strongmen who promised a more immediate deliverance from economic woes." The book's brevity is an asset—Wu skillfully avoids economic and legal rabbit holes, keeping the book laser-focused on his thesis: that antitrust enforcement must be restored "as a check on power as necessary in a functioning democracy before it's too late." Persuasive and brilliantly written, the book is especially timely given the rise of trillion-dollar tech companies. (Nov.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.

PW Reviews 2018 September #4

In this short but persuasive book, Wu (The Attention Merchants), a Columbia law professor, connects the current political climate to a decline in antitrust enforcement. From the rise of U.S. Steel and Standard Oil through the "trust-busting" days of Teddy Roosevelt, Wu shows how antitrust laws, as championed by Louis Brandeis (who coined the term "the curse of bigness"), once functioned as a check on private power. In the modern era, however, enforcement has steadily declined; the George W. Bush administration did not bring a single antitrust action in eight years. The results, Wu argues, are a widening income gap and corporations subverting electoral politics. In the 20th century, he writes, "nations that failed to control private power and attend to the needs of their citizens faced the rise of strongmen who promised a more immediate deliverance from economic woes." The book's brevity is an asset—Wu skillfully avoids economic and legal rabbit holes, keeping the book laser-focused on his thesis: that antitrust enforcement must be restored "as a check on power as necessary in a functioning democracy before it's too late." Persuasive and brilliantly written, the book is especially timely given the rise of trillion-dollar tech companies. (Nov.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.