This promise of change : one girl's story in the fight for school equality / by Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: "In 1956, one year before federal troops escorted the Little Rock 9 into Central High School, fourteen year old Jo Ann Allen was one of twelve African-American students who broke the color barrier and integrated Clinton High School in Tennessee. At first things went smoothly for the Clinton 12, but then outside agitators interfered, pitting the townspeople against one another. Uneasiness turned into anger, and even the Clinton Twelve themselves wondered if the easier thing to do would be to go back to their old school. Jo Ann--clear-eyed, practical, tolerant, and popular among both black and white students--found herself called on as the spokesperson of the group. But what about just being a regular teen? This is the heartbreaking and relatable story of her four months thrust into the national spotlight and as a trailblazer in history. Based on original research and interviews and featuring backmatter with archival materials and notes from the authors on the co-writing process"-- Provided by publisher.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references.
      Age 10-12.
      Grade level 4-6.
    • ISBN:
      9781681198521
      1681198525
    • Accession Number:
      2018026349
    • Accession Number:
      on1055568316
      1055568316
    • Accession Number:
      fay.597735

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2018 November #1

Students of school-desegregation history know of the Little Rock 9, but probably fewer are familiar with the Clinton 12, who integrated a Tennessee high school a full year earlier, in 1956. Boyce, one of the 12, recounts her story in a series of moving narrative poems that detail mid-twentieth-century segregation practices in the South; introduce her family and their place in the town; describe the early, relatively civilized integration of the school; and explain how the introduction of outside agitators heightened tensions and led to violence. Boyce's positive attitude about her experiences invites reader identification. Yes, she and others endured unrelenting pressure and threats, but the cause was important and the results worthwhile. The poems (mostly free verse with a sprinkling of other forms) personalize this history, and interspersed newspaper headlines and quotes situate the response of the larger world. Generous back matter includes additional information about the Clinton 12, a time line, period photos, sources, and further reading. Engrossing, informative, and important for middle-grade collections. Grades 5-9. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2019 Fall

In 1956 Clinton, Tennessee, twelve African American students integrated the all-white high school. Boyce, one of the "Clinton 12," relates (with coauthor Levy) her first-person account in free-verse passages that often include rhyme and employ various poetic forms. Newspaper headlines and clips, excerpts from the Constitution, and more appear throughout this fine addition to books about the integration of public schools during the civil rights era. Reading list, timeline. Bib. Copyright 2019 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2019 #1

In 1956 in the small town of Clinton, Tennessee, twelve African American students integrated the all-white high school. Jo Ann Allen Boyce, one of the "Clinton 12," narrates this first-person account. She lives with her family up on the Hill, a part of the city that was settled by formerly enslaved people after the Civil War. Jo Ann and her family are active in their church, and her knowledge of religious songs and biblical history is threaded throughout the memoir. The book consists of free-verse passages that often include rhyme and employ various forms such as pantoum and villanelle. (One haiku titled "And Then There Are the Thumbtacks" reads: "Scattered on our chairs / A prank straight out of cartoons / They think we don't look?") Boyce's character evolves throughout the book. Though not naive about racism early on, she later fully experiences the weight of white supremacy. Even her white neighbors on the Hill turn on her family members once they are perceived as stepping "out of their place." Newspaper headlines and clips, excerpts from the Constitution, and examples of artifacts such as signs held by protesters ("We Won't Go to School with Negroes") are interspersed throughout. This fine addition to texts about the integration of public schools during the civil rights era in the United States concludes with an epilogue, biographical information about the Clinton 12, a scrapbook of photographs, source notes, and a timeline. jonda c. mcnair January/February 2019 p 111 Copyright 2018 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.