Hillbilly Elegy [electronic resource] / J. D. Vance

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, NAMED BY THE TIMES AS ONE OF "6 BOOKS TO HELP UNDERSTAND TRUMP'S WIN" AND SOON TO BE A MAJOR-MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY RON HOWARD "You will not read a more important book about America this year. "—The Economist "A riveting book."—The Wall Street Journal "Essential reading."—David Brooks, New York Times Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for more than forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.'s grandparents were "dirt poor and in love," and moved north from Kentucky's Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually one of their grandchildren would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that J.D.'s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, never fully escaping the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. With piercing honesty, Vance shows how he himself still carries around the demons of his chaotic family history. A deeply moving memoir, with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.
    • Notes:
      Adobe EPUB eBook ebook-epub-adobe 624810
      Kindle Book ebook-kindle
      OverDrive Read ebook-overdrive 624793
    • ISBN:
      9780062872258
    • Accession Number:
      fay.630029
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      VANCE, J. D. Hillbilly Elegy. [electronic resource]. [s. l.]: HarperCollins, 2018. ISBN 9780062872258. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.630029. Acesso em: 25 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Vance JD. Hillbilly Elegy. [Electronic Resource]. HarperCollins; 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.630029. Accessed May 25, 2020.
    • APA:
      Vance, J. D. (2018). Hillbilly Elegy. [electronic resource]. HarperCollins.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Vance, J. D. 2018. Hillbilly Elegy. [Electronic Resource]. HarperCollins. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.630029.
    • Harvard:
      Vance, J. D. (2018) Hillbilly Elegy. [electronic resource]. HarperCollins. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.630029 (Accessed: 25 May 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Vance, JD 2018, Hillbilly Elegy. [electronic resource], HarperCollins, viewed 25 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Vance, J. D. Hillbilly Elegy. [Electronic Resource]. HarperCollins, 2018. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.630029.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Vance, J. D. Hillbilly Elegy. [Electronic Resource]. HarperCollins, 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.630029.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Vance JD. Hillbilly Elegy. [electronic resource] [Internet]. HarperCollins; 2018 [cited 2020 May 25]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.630029

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2016 June #1

Things could have so easily turned out differently for Vance. Growing up in a working-class family riven by strife and seemingly incapable of escaping its rural Kentucky roots, Vance spent his youth bouncing between homes, a succession of father figures, and ever more explosive situations. The story of how he overcame his upbringing to graduate from Yale Law School and embark on a stable and happy adulthood poses the bigger question of how the obstacles facing other such "hillbillies" can be surmounted. Vance compellingly describes the terrible toll that alcoholism, drug abuse, and an unrelenting code of honor took on his family, neither excusing the behavior nor condemning it. Instead, he pulls back to examine the larger social forces at work for white, working-class Americans with ties to Appalachia. The portrait that emerges is a complex one, where die-hard cultural beliefs contribute to a downward spiral for Vance's family and those like them. Unerringly forthright, remarkably insightful, and refreshingly focused, Hillbilly Elegy is the cry of a community in crisis. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2016 May #2

Growing up in Appalachia may leave a person open to harsh criticism and stereotype, yet Vance delves into his childhood and upbringing to make a clear distinction between perception and reality. Born in Kentucky and shuffling among homes in Ohio, the author ended the cycle of poverty, abuse, and drug use after becoming a U.S. Marine and Yale Law School graduate. His memoir is less about his triumph and more about exposing the gritty truth of how a culture fell into ruin. Using examples from his own life with references to articles and studies throughout, Vance's intent is to show that what was once the fulfillment of the American Dream—moving to the Rust Belt for a better life—has now left families in peril. His plea is not for sympathy but for understanding. Both heartbreaking and heartwarming, this memoir is akin to investigative journalism. While some characters seem too caricaturelike, it is often those terrifyingly authentic traits that make people memorable. Vance is careful to point out that this is his recollection of events; not everyone is painted in a positive light. VERDICT A quick and engaging read, this book is well suited to anyone interested in a study of modern America, as Vance's assertions about Appalachia are far more reaching.—Kaitlin Malixi, formerly at Virginia Beach P.L.

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