How to disappear : notes on invisibility in a time of transparency / Akiko Busch.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: "Vivid, surprising, and utterly timely, Akiko Busch's How to disappear explores the idea of invisibility in nature, art, and science, in search of a more joyful and peaceful way of living in today's increasingly surveilled and publicity-obsessed world In our increasingly networked and image-saturated lives, the notion of disappearing has never been both more enchanting and yet fanciful. Today, we are relentlessly encouraged, even conditioned, to reveal, share, and self-promote. The pressure to be public comes not just from our peers, but vast and pervasive technology companies, which want to profit from patterns in our behavior. A lifelong student and observer of the natural world, Busch sets out to explore her own uneasiness with this arrangement, and what she senses is a widespread desire for a less scrutinized way of life--for invisibility. Writing in rich painterly detail about her own life, her family, and some of the world's most exotic and remote places--from the Cayman Islands to Iceland--she savors the pleasures of being unseen. Discovering and dramatizing a wonderful range of ways of disappearing, from virtual reality goggles that trick the wearer into believing her body has disappeared and to the way Virginia Woolf's fictional Mrs. Dalloway feels a flickering of personhood as an older woman, Busch deliberates on subjects new and old with equal sensitivity and incisiveness. A unique and exhilarating accomplishment, How to disappear is a shimmering collage of poetry, cinema, memoir, myth, and much more, which overturns the dangerous modern assumption that somehow fame and visibility equate to success and happiness"-- Provided by publisher.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Busch explores the idea of invisibility in nature, art, and science, in relation to our increasingly networked and image-saturated lives. We are relentlessly encouraged to reveal, share, and self-promote-- and technology companies stand ready to profit from this behavior. Busch explores her own uneasiness with this arrangement, and savors the pleasures of being unseen. She examines a range of ways of disappearing, such as virtual reality goggles that trick the wearer into believing her body has disappeared while overturning the assumption that fame and visibility equate to success and happiness. -- adapted from publisher info
    • Content Notes:
      The invisible friend -- Orlando's ring -- Across the natural world -- Invisiphilia -- Invisible ink -- At the identity spa -- The anonymity proposal -- Rereading Mrs. Dalloway -- The vanishing self -- The geography of invisibility -- With wonder.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references.
    • ISBN:
      9781101980415
      1101980419
      9781101980422
      1101980427
    • Accession Number:
      2018029070
    • Accession Number:
      on1035785943
      1035785943
    • Accession Number:
      fay.637839
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BUSCH, A. How to disappear : notes on invisibility in a time of transparency. [s. l.]: Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC, 2019. ISBN 9781101980415. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.637839. Acesso em: 12 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Busch A. How to Disappear : Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency. Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC; 2019. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.637839. Accessed July 12, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      Busch A. How to Disappear : Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency. Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC; 2019. Accessed July 12, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.637839
    • APA:
      Busch, A. (2019). How to disappear : notes on invisibility in a time of transparency. Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Busch, Akiko. 2019. How to Disappear : Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency. Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.637839.
    • Harvard:
      Busch, A. (2019) How to disappear : notes on invisibility in a time of transparency. Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.637839 (Accessed: 12 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Busch, A 2019, How to disappear : notes on invisibility in a time of transparency, Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC, viewed 12 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Busch, Akiko. How to Disappear : Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency. Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC, 2019. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.637839.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Busch, Akiko. How to Disappear : Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency. Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC, 2019. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.637839.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Busch A. How to disappear : notes on invisibility in a time of transparency [Internet]. Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC; 2019 [cited 2020 Jul 12]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.637839

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2019 February #2

Busch (The Incidental Steward, 2013) writes about nature and culture with delving curiosity and fresh thinking, offering here a unique engagement with the phenomenon and concept of invisibility. This supple and surprising inquiry was prompted by contemplation of the many modes of digital visibility, from social media and zillions of websites to the harvesting of pervasive forms of surveillance to the constant mining of personal data. What does all this exposure and our obsession with "optics" reveal about our sense of self and society? What might be gained by a reclamation of privacy and discretion? What might invisibility grant us? Busch investigates the divide between our visible and inner selves in this zestfully perceptive "field guide to invisibility." She describes wondrous strategies for concealment in the natural world, considers the role of invisibility in myths and the arts, shares personal experiences, and notes various ways in which we are rendered invisible for better or worse. Ultimately, Busch elegantly advocates for "elective invisibility" as a way of acquiring "a more humanitarian view of the larger world." Eye-opening and inspiring. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2019 February #1

In an age of social media and constant surveillance, Busch (faculty, Sch. of Visual Arts; Nine Ways To Cross a River) explores the many facets of invisibility in nature, science, and the arts. Her essays run the gamut from children's invisible friends to items in literature, such as rings and cloaks that make the wearer disappear, to the science of making objects appear invisible. The author also shares how plants such as the pebble plant blend into the landscape, how camouflage and countershading protect animal species, and how ocean divers are unperceived and ignored by ocean fauna. Artists paint human models to blend into various backgrounds and photograph them. Marginalized populations and women of a certain age seem to disappear to the rest of the world. The author explains how, in Iceland, spirit beings, the Huldufolk or Alfar, are real to many. Busch also investigates augmented reality; for example, artist Mark Skwarek digitally restored the natural landscape of the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea, deleting the military installations. VERDICT An impressive look at myriad, diverse examples of invisibility that will appeal to those interested in social sciences and the arts.—Sue O'Brien, Downers Grove, IL

Copyright 2019 Library Journal.

PW Reviews 2018 October #1

Essayist Busch (The Incidental Steward) meditates on how the human need for privacy and anonymity has reasserted itself with new urgency amid the exhibitionism of the technology-imbued modern world. With many seeking an "alternative to a life of perpetual display," she offers a "field guide to invisibility," with examples from science, literature, and visual art. The book draws from J.K. Rowling and Hans Christian Andersen to explore how children yearn for the ethereal, and shows how "erasure books," like those of poet Mary Ruefle, create something new by obscuring the old. Astutely noting the significance of contemporary language like "ghosting" and "unseeing" things, Busch suggests absence can become a presence in its own right. Elsewhere, she visits Duke University's engineering department to experiment with a real-life "cloaking device" and goes scuba diving to "become a refugee of the visible world." Busch's exploration of her subject is free-associative, wide-ranging, and poetic in its own right. Her description of visiting New York City's Grand Central Terminal is particularly striking, as she is "swept along by the stream of humanity" amid the seemingly choreographed "gorgeous multitude." Busch offers a path to quiet dignity that is rich and enlightening. Agent: Albert LaFarge, Albert LaFarge Literary Agency. (Feb.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.