Brown Girl Dreaming [electronic resource] : Woodson, Jacqueline.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      Unabridged.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: A New York Times, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verse.Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights Movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child's soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson's eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.
    • Notes:
      Cast: Woodson, Jacqueline
    • Notes:
      Audio book.
      Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] Penguin Random House 2014 Available via World Wide Web.
      Format: MP3
      Requires: cloudLibrary (file size: 108.0 MB)
    • ISBN:
      9780553397277
    • Accession Number:
      fay.644240
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      WOODSON, J. Brown Girl Dreaming. [electronic resource] : Unabridged. [s. l.]: Penguin Random House, 2014. ISBN 9780553397277. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.644240. Acesso em: 24 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Woodson J. Brown Girl Dreaming. [Electronic Resource] : Unabridged. Penguin Random House; 2014. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.644240. Accessed May 24, 2020.
    • APA:
      Woodson, J. (2014). Brown Girl Dreaming. [electronic resource] : (Unabridged.). Penguin Random House.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Woodson, Jacqueline. 2014. Brown Girl Dreaming. [Electronic Resource] : Unabridged. Penguin Random House. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.644240.
    • Harvard:
      Woodson, J. (2014) Brown Girl Dreaming. [electronic resource] : Unabridged. Penguin Random House. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.644240 (Accessed: 24 May 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Woodson, J 2014, Brown Girl Dreaming. [electronic resource] :, Unabridged., Penguin Random House, viewed 24 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Woodson, Jacqueline. Brown Girl Dreaming. [Electronic Resource] : Unabridged., Penguin Random House, 2014. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.644240.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Woodson, Jacqueline. Brown Girl Dreaming. [Electronic Resource] : Unabridged. Penguin Random House, 2014. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.644240.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Woodson J. Brown Girl Dreaming. [electronic resource] : [Internet]. Unabridged. Penguin Random House; 2014 [cited 2020 May 24]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.644240

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2014 August #1

*Starred Review* What is this book about? In an appended author's note, Woodson says it best: "my past, my people, my memories, my story." The resulting memoir in verse is a marvel, as it turns deeply felt remembrances of Woodson's preadolescent life into art, through memories of her homes in Ohio, South Carolina, and, finally, New York City, and of her friends and family. Small things—ice cream from the candy store, her grandfather's garden, fireflies in jelly jars—become large as she recalls them and translates them into words. She gives context to her life as she writes about racial discrimination, the civil rights movement, and, later, Black Power. But her focus is always on her family. Her earliest years are spent in Ohio, but after her parents separate, her mother moves her children to South Carolina to live with Woodson's beloved grandparents, and then to New York City, a place, Woodson recalls, "of gray rock, cold and treeless as a bad dream." But in time it, too, becomes home; she makes a best friend, Maria, and begins to dream of becoming a writer when she gets her first composition notebook and then discovers she has a talent for telling stories. Her mother cautions her not to write about her family, but, happily, many years later she has—and the result is both elegant and eloquent, a haunting book about memory that is itself altogether memorable. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2015 Spring

A memoir-in-verse so immediate, readers will feel they are experiencing Woodson's childhood along with her. We see young Jackie grow up not just in historical context but also in the context of extended family, community, and religion (she was raised Jehovah's Witness). Most notably, we trace her development as a nascent writer. The poetry here sings: specific, lyrical, and full of imagery.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2014 #6

In this memoir in verse, Woodson offers an intimate, immediate portrait of her unfolding childhood, haunted by specters of discrimination and cheered by the comfort of family. The author's own narration, with the resonance of a storyteller, is plainly conversational. Her easy cadence leaves phrases open, ready to accept the next line, establishing a comfortable, familiar rhythm perfectly suited to the natural verse. Never calling attention to itself, Woodson's honest reading, with nuanced pauses, inflections, and occasional whispers, invests the emotional impact in service to the poetry, where it belongs. The memoir is already receiving lots of attention, and this audio production offers another entry point into a compelling, transformative life story. thom barthelmes Copyright 2014 Horn Book Magazine.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2014 #5

Here is a memoir-in-verse so immediate that readers will feel they are experiencing the author's childhood right along with her. It starts out somewhat slowly, with Woodson relying on others' memories to relate her (1963) birth and infancy in Ohio, but that just serves to underscore the vividness of the material once she begins to share her own memories; once her family arrives in Greenville, South Carolina, where they live with her maternal grandparents. Woodson describes a South where the whites-only signs may have been removed but where her grandmother still can't get waited on in Woolworth's, where young people are sitting at lunch counters and standing up for civil rights; and Woodson expertly weaves that history into her own. However, we see young Jackie grow up not just in historical context but also--and equally--in the context of extended family, community (Greenville and, later, Brooklyn), and religion (she was raised Jehovah's Witness). Most notably of all, perhaps, we trace her development as a nascent writer, from her early, overarching love of stories through her struggles to learn to read through the thrill of her first blank composition book to her realization that "words are [her] brilliance." The poetry here sings: specific, lyrical, and full of imagery: "So the first time my mother goes to New York City / we don't know to be sad, the weight / of our grandparents' love like a blanket / with us beneath it, / safe and warm." An extraordinary--indeed brilliant--portrait of a writer as a young girl. martha v. parravan Copyright 2014 Horn Book Magazine.

PW Reviews 2014 May #4

Written in verse, Woodson's collection of childhood memories provides insight into the Newbery Honor author's perspective of America, "a country caught/ between Black and White," during the turbulent 1960s. Jacqueline was born in Ohio, but spent much of her early years with her grandparents in South Carolina, where she learned about segregation and was made to follow the strict rules of Jehovah's Witnesses, her grandmother's religion. Wrapped in the cocoon of family love and appreciative of the beauty around her, Jacqueline experiences joy and the security of home. Her move to Brooklyn leads to additional freedoms, but also a sense of loss: "Who could love/ this place—where/ no pine trees grow, no porch swings move/ with the weight of/ your grandmother on them." The writer's passion for stories and storytelling permeates the memoir, explicitly addressed in her early attempts to write books and implicitly conveyed through her sharp images and poignant observations seen through the eyes of a child. Woodson's ability to listen and glean meaning from what she hears lead to an astute understanding of her surroundings, friends, and family. Ages 10–up. Agent: Charlotte Sheedy Literary Agency. (Aug.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC