The Undefeated [electronic resource] : Alexander, Kwame.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: The Newbery Award-winning author of THE CROSSOVER pens an ode to black American triumph and tribulation, with art from a two-time Caldecott Honoree. Originally performed for ESPN's The Undefeated, this poem is a love letter to black life in the United States. It highlights the unspeakable trauma of slavery, the faith and fire of the civil rights movement, and the grit, passion, and perseverance of some of the world's greatest heroes. The text is also peppered with references to the words of Martin Luther King, Jr., Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, and others, offering deeper insights into the accomplishments of the past, while bringing stark attention to the endurance and spirit of those surviving and thriving in the present. Robust back matter at the end provides valuable historical context and additional detail for those wishing to learn more.
    • Notes:
      Electronic book.
      Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] HMH Books 2019 Available via World Wide Web.
      Format: Adobe EPUB
      Requires: cloudLibrary (file size: 20.1 MB)
    • ISBN:
      9780358057611
    • Accession Number:
      fay.658993
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ALEXANDER, K. The Undefeated. [electronic resource] : [s. l.]: HMH Books, 2019. ISBN 9780358057611. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.658993. Acesso em: 25 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Alexander K. The Undefeated. [Electronic Resource] : HMH Books; 2019. Accessed November 25, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.658993
    • APA:
      Alexander, K. (2019). The Undefeated. [electronic resource] : HMH Books.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Alexander, Kwame. 2019. The Undefeated. [Electronic Resource] : HMH Books. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.658993.
    • Harvard:
      Alexander, K. (2019) The Undefeated. [electronic resource] : HMH Books. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.658993 (Accessed: 25 November 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Alexander, K 2019, The Undefeated. [electronic resource] :, HMH Books, viewed 25 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Alexander, Kwame. The Undefeated. [Electronic Resource] : HMH Books, 2019. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.658993.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Alexander, Kwame. The Undefeated. [Electronic Resource] : HMH Books, 2019. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.658993.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Alexander K. The Undefeated. [electronic resource] : [Internet]. HMH Books; 2019 [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.658993

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2019 February #2

*Starred Review* Alexander and Nelson combine their considerable talents in this ode to inspiring African American heroes in the fields of sport, the arts, and political activism, as well as everyday champions whose very survival exemplifies success. In elegiac-style verse, Alexander celebrates "the swift and sweet ones / who hurdled history . . . / the ones who survived / America / by any means necessary," and those "who shine / their light for the world to see / and don't stop / ‘til the break of dawn." Nelson's photo-realistic illustrations, rendered in oil, include action shots (Jesse Owens, mid hurdle), portraits (Martin Luther King Jr. and an African American Union soldier), composites (of jazz and sports greats), and iconographic compositions that depict the unspeakable (bodies lined up representing abducted Africans en route to America, part of the Middle Passage). Designed for reading aloud, the text also makes use of several typographic cues that signal meaning: emphasized words appear in larger font, while references to the words of others ("we shall not be moved") appear in italics. And, while the content references several tragic events (slavery and police brutality, among others), the poem closes with a hopeful nod to the rising generation. Appended with notes on the historical figures cited, this is a beautiful volume that encourages multiple viewings and further research. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: With a lengthy roster of accolades and best-seller credits between them, this untouchable duo's book will fly off the shelf. Grades 3-6. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2019 Fall

Alexander and Nelson honor the achievements, courage, and perseverance of ordinary black people as well as prominent black artists, athletes, and activists. Alexander's free-verse poem conveys a sense of pride at what his "unflappable" and "unafraid" predecessors have accomplished and what people continue to do today. Nelson's realistic oil paintings depict racial oppression in the past and present--demonstrating that racism remains deeply entrenched in America today. Copyright 2019 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2019 #2

Alexander and Nelson honor the achievements, courage, and perseverance of ordinary black people as well as prominent black artists, athletes, and activists. The free-verse poem begins: "This is for the unforgettable. / The swift and sweet ones / who hurdled history / and opened a world / of possible. The ones who survived / America / by any means necessary. / And the ones who didn't." While some events (e.g., the transatlantic slave trade) are "unspeakable," Alexander's words convey a sense of pride at what his "unflappable" and "unafraid" ancestors have accomplished and continue to do despite racial oppression. He incorporates the words of black icons (such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.) and movements (Black Lives Matter), creating a through-line from past to present. Nelson's paintings effectively use white space to extend the text and amplify its meaning. For example, the image of enslaved people on ships shows the figures in cramped quarters—a double-page spread compact with black bodies; while what accompanies the text for "the ones who didn't [survive]" is simply two blank pages. The realistic oil paintings convey racial oppression in the past (black-and-white images of the four little girls who were killed during the church bombing in Birmingham) and present (full-color paintings of African Americans killed recently by police)—demonstrating that racism remains deeply entrenched in America today. Nelson depicts numerous famous people whom adults and children may recognize, from Billie Holiday to LeBron James, as well as others (Sarah Vaughan, Romare Bearden) whose faces and stories they may not know. The book concludes with an afterword by Alexander and an annotated list of historical figures and events featured in The Undefeated. jonda c. mcnair March/April 2019 p 93 Copyright 2019 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

PW Reviews 2019 February #1

Performed first on the ESPN show of the same name, this magnificent anthem to the courage and genius of black Americans has been turned into a picture book with stunning portraits by Nelson (Blue Sky, White Stars). "This is for the unforgettable," Alexander (Out of Wonder) opens, "The swift and sweet ones/ who hurdled history/ and opened a world/ of possible." Jesse Owens flies across the page, every limb outstretched, every muscle taut. Alexander's praise is not just for well-known figures, though; he also writes about nameless heroes ("the ones who survived/ America/ by any means necessary") and unsung martyrs ("the ones who didn't"). And he acknowledges the deepest wounds, repeating the phrase "This is for the unspeakable" over successive portraits of infamous atrocities committed against Americans of African descent. He writes of artistry, "the We Real Cool ones," above the smiling, lit-up faces of vocal and instrumental artists who make up a celestial chorus: Monk and Fitzgerald, Vaughan and Davis. Nelson paints historical figures and contemporary heroes with equal ease and grace; in a final spread, the faces of young black girls and boys look ahead, beaming and determined: "This is for us." Throughout, incantatory usage of "un" words ("unbelievable... unbending... underdogs... uncertain...") rings with force. Alexander remembers peaceful Civil Rights activists, "the righteous marching ones who sang we shall not be moved because black lives matter," communicating clearly that when black lives matter, America is stronger. Historical notes for each figure conclude this powerful work. Ages 4–7. Author's agent: Arielle Eckstut, Levine Greenberg Rostan Literary Agency. Illustrator's agent: Steven Malk, Writers House.(Apr.)

Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.