Talking to strangers : what we should know about the people we don't know / Malcolm Gladwell.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: In this thoughtful treatise spurred by the 2015 death of African-American academic Sandra Bland in jail after a traffic stop, New Yorker writer Gladwell (The Tipping Point) aims to figure out the strategies people use to assess strangers-to "analyze, critique them, figure out where they came from, figure out how to fix them," in other words: to understand how to balance trust and safety. He uses a variety of examples from history and recent headlines to illustrate that people size up the motivations, emotions, and trustworthiness of those they don't know both wrongly and with misplaced confidence.
    • Content Notes:
      Introduction: "Step out of the car!" -- Part one: Spies and diplomats: two puzzles. Fidel Castor's revenge ; Getting to know der Führer -- Part two: Default to truth. The queen of Cuba ; The holy fool ; Case study: The boy in the shower -- Part three: Transparency. The Friends fallacy ; A (short) explanation of the Amanda Knox case ; Case study: The fraternity party -- Part four: Lessons. KSM: what happens when the stranger is a terrorist? -- Part five: Coupling. Sylvia Plath ; Case study: The Kansas City experiments ; Sandra Bland.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (pages 349-379) and index.
    • ISBN:
      9780316478526
      0316478520
    • Accession Number:
      2019935109
    • Accession Number:
      on1107437182
      1107437182
    • Accession Number:
      fay.663491
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      GLADWELL, M. Talking to strangers : what we should know about the people we don’t know. First edition. [s. l.]: Little, Brown and Company, 2019. ISBN 9780316478526. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.663491. Acesso em: 2 abr. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Gladwell M. Talking to Strangers : What We Should Know about the People We Don’t Know. First edition. Little, Brown and Company; 2019. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.663491. Accessed April 2, 2020.
    • APA:
      Gladwell, M. (2019). Talking to strangers : what we should know about the people we don’t know (First edition.). Little, Brown and Company.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Gladwell, Malcolm. 2019. Talking to Strangers : What We Should Know about the People We Don’t Know. First edition. Little, Brown and Company. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.663491.
    • Harvard:
      Gladwell, M. (2019) Talking to strangers : what we should know about the people we don’t know. First edition. Little, Brown and Company. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.663491 (Accessed: 2 April 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Gladwell, M 2019, Talking to strangers : what we should know about the people we don’t know, First edition., Little, Brown and Company, viewed 2 April 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Gladwell, Malcolm. Talking to Strangers : What We Should Know about the People We Don’t Know. First edition., Little, Brown and Company, 2019. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.663491.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Gladwell, Malcolm. Talking to Strangers : What We Should Know about the People We Don’t Know. First edition. Little, Brown and Company, 2019. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.663491.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Gladwell M. Talking to strangers : what we should know about the people we don’t know [Internet]. First edition. Little, Brown and Company; 2019 [cited 2020 Apr 2]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.663491

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2019 August #1

Like his New Yorker articles and previous books, Gladwell's newest is chock-full of gripping anecdotes from the recent and forgotten past, from Amanda Knox's overturned murder conviction to the double agents who sunk the CIA's spying efforts in 1980s Cuba. He uses these riveting stories to offer up bite-size observations about how we engage with strangers. For example, we think of ourselves as complex but of strangers as straightforward. Not so, Gladwell insists. The stranger is not easy; she is never as transparent as we believe. Gladwell's case studies are thrilling, but their relevance to everyday encounters is frequently obtuse, and the takeaways from them are often buried or provocative. Ultimately, Gladwell argues that it's essential to give strangers the benefit of the doubt, even in very different situations, such as when Penn State president Graham Spanier accepted reports of Jerry Sandusky's suspicious behavior with a minor as "horseplay" and when Texas state trooper Brian Encinia pulled Sandra Bland over after a minor traffic infraction. Readers may find that Gladwell's alluringly simple lesson dangerously oversimplifies power dynamics in twenty-first-century America. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Booklist Reviews 2019 August #1

Like his New Yorker articles and previous books, Gladwell's newest is chock-full of gripping anecdotes from the recent and forgotten past, from Amanda Knox's overturned murder conviction to the double agents who sunk the CIA's spying efforts in 1980s Cuba. He uses these riveting stories to offer up bite-size observations about how we engage with strangers. For example, we think of ourselves as complex but of strangers as straightforward. Not so, Gladwell insists. The stranger is not easy; she is never as transparent as we believe. Gladwell's case studies are thrilling, but their relevance to everyday encounters is frequently obtuse, and the takeaways from them are often buried or provocative. Ultimately, Gladwell argues that it's essential to give strangers the benefit of the doubt, even in very different situations, such as when Penn State president Graham Spanier accepted reports of Jerry Sandusky's suspicious behavior with a minor as "horseplay" and when Texas state trooper Brian Encinia pulled Sandra Bland over after a minor traffic infraction. Readers may find that Gladwell's alluringly simple lesson dangerously oversimplifies power dynamics in twenty-first-century America. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2019 July

The prolific, best-selling Gladwell (David and Goliath; The Tipping Point) presents an intriguing analysis of what far too often goes wrong when strangers meet, diving deeply into relatively well-known controversial public incidents thoroughly covered by the mass media to cast doubt on how the general public has come to understand these events. The deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, the suicide of Sylvia Plath, the Jerry Sandusky pedophilia scandal at Pennsylvania State University, and the death of Sandra Bland highlight the premise that ordinary tools and techniques used to make sense of people we don't know have failed society. The result of this failure is further conflict and misunderstanding that impact international relations and even threaten world order. Many of the examples exemplify how race, gender, age, language, country of origin, perceived threat, challenge to authority, contextual setting, and other variables can dominate impulsive behavior that shuns connections among people. VERDICT This work should stimulate further research that could serve as control for these variables and more directly link how the factor of strangeness might influence certain reactions, providing a valuable contribution to psychology and psychiatry collections in larger university libraries.—Dale Farris, Groves, TX

Copyright 2019 Library Journal.

PW Reviews 2019 May #3

In this thoughtful treatise spurred by the 2015 death of African-American academic Sandra Bland in jail after a traffic stop, New Yorker writer Gladwell (The Tipping Point) aims to figure out the strategies people use to assess strangers—to "analyze , critique them, figure out where they came from, figure out how to fix them," in other words: to understand how to balance trust and safety. He uses a variety of examples from history and recent headlines to illustrate that people size up the motivations, emotions, and trustworthiness of those they don't know both wrongly and with misplaced confidence. He relates, for example, the story of a whole cadre of American spies in Cuba who were carefully handpicked by American intelligence operatives, all of whom turned out to be pro-Castro double agents. Gladwell writes in his signature colorful, fluid, and accessible prose, though he occasionally fails to make fully clear the connection between a seemingly tangential topic such as suicide risk and the book's main questions. In addition to providing an analysis of human mental habits and interactions, Gladwell pleas for more thoughtful ways of behaving and advocates for people to embrace trust, rather than defaulting to distrust, and not to "blame the stranger." Readers will find this both fascinating and topical. Agent: Tina Bennett, William Morris Endeavor. (Sept.)

Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.