Eleanor & Park / Rainbow Rowell.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Two misfits. One extraordinary love. Eleanor -- Red hair, wrong clothes. Standing behind him until he turns his head. Lying beside him until he wakes up. Making everyone else seem drabber and flatter and never good enough -- Eleanor. Park -- He knows she'll love a song before he plays it for her. He laughs at her jokes before she ever gets to the punch line. There's a place on his chest, just below his throat, that makes her want to keep promises -- Park. Set over the course of one school year, this is the story of two star-crossed sixteen-year-olds -- smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try.
    • Notes:
      580 Lexile.
      Accelerated Reader UG 3.8 11.
      Reading Counts High School 4.3 19.
      Accelerated Reader AR 3.8 11.0 157569.
      Accelerated Reader AR UG 3.8 11 157569.
      Boston Globe/Horn Book Fiction Award Winner, 2013.
    • Other Titles:
      Eleanor and Park.
    • ISBN:
      9781250012579
      1250012570
      9781250044990
      1250044995
    • Accession Number:
      2012042136
    • Accession Number:
      ocn819860760
      819860760
    • Accession Number:
      fay.679583
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ROWELL, R. Eleanor & Park. First edition. [s. l.]: St. Martin’s Griffin, 2013. ISBN 9781250012579. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.679583. Acesso em: 22 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Rowell R. Eleanor & Park. First edition. St. Martin’s Griffin; 2013. Accessed October 22, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.679583
    • APA:
      Rowell, R. (2013). Eleanor & Park (First edition.). St. Martin’s Griffin.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Rowell, Rainbow. 2013. Eleanor & Park. First edition. St. Martin’s Griffin. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.679583.
    • Harvard:
      Rowell, R. (2013) Eleanor & Park. First edition. St. Martin’s Griffin. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.679583 (Accessed: 22 October 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Rowell, R 2013, Eleanor & Park, First edition., St. Martin’s Griffin, viewed 22 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Rowell, Rainbow. Eleanor & Park. First edition., St. Martin’s Griffin, 2013. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.679583.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Rowell, Rainbow. Eleanor & Park. First edition. St. Martin’s Griffin, 2013. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.679583.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Rowell R. Eleanor & Park [Internet]. First edition. St. Martin’s Griffin; 2013 [cited 2020 Oct 22]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.679583

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2013 January #1

*Starred Review* Right from the start of this tender debut, readers can almost hear the clock winding down on Eleanor and Park. After a less than auspicious start, the pair quietly builds a relationship while riding the bus to school every day, wordlessly sharing comics and eventually music on the commute. Their worlds couldn't be more different. Park's family is idyllic: his Vietnam vet father and Korean immigrant mother are genuinely loving. Meanwhile, Eleanor and her younger siblings live in poverty under the constant threat of Richie, their abusive and controlling stepfather, while their mother inexplicably caters to his whims. The couple's personal battles are also dark mirror images. Park struggles with the realities of falling for the school outcast; in one of the more subtle explorations of race and the other in recent YA fiction, he clashes with his father over the definition of manhood. Eleanor's fight is much more external, learning to trust her feelings about Park and navigating the sexual threat in Richie's watchful gaze. In rapidly alternating narrative voices, Eleanor and Park try to express their all-consuming love. You make me feel like a cannibal, Eleanor says. The pure, fear-laced, yet steadily maturing relationship they develop is urgent, moving, and, of course, heartbreaking, too. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2013 Fall

It's the start of a new school year in 1986 Omaha when sophomores Eleanor and Park meet on the bus. She's an ostracized "big girl"; he's a skinny half-Korean townie who tries to stay out of the spotlight. Their slowly evolving relationship is life-changing for them both. Rowell imbues the novel with rich character development for a heart-wrenching portrayal of imperfect but unforgettable love

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2013 #3

It's the start of a new school year in 1986 Omaha when sophomores Eleanor and Park meet for the first time on the bus. They are an unusual pair: she's the new girl in town, an ostracized, bullied "big girl" with bright red curly hair, freckles, and an odd wardrobe; he's a skinny half-Korean townie who mostly wears black and tries to stay out of the spotlight. But as they sit together on the school bus every day, an intimacy gradually develops between them. At first they don't talk; then she reads his comics with him; he makes her mixtapes of his favorite rock bands; they hold hands; and eventually they are looking for ways to spend every waking hour together. Their slowly evolving but intense relationship is chaste first love, authentic in its awkwardness -- full of insecurities, miscommunications, and sexual awakenings -- and life-changing for them both. When Eleanor's unstable home life (replete with abusive stepfather) ultimately tears the young lovers apart, the novel ends realistically: uncertain, yet still hopeful. Rowell presents her teen protagonists' intelligent observations, extreme inner desires, and irrational feelings through compelling alternating narrations. She imbues the novel with rich character development, a spot-on depiction of the 1980s, and powerful descriptive passages ("Holding Eleanor's hand was like holding a butterfly. Or a heartbeat. Like holding something complete, and completely alive"). It's an honest, heart-wrenching portrayal of imperfect but unforgettable love. cynthia k. ritter

PW Reviews 2012 December #2

Half-Korean sophomore Park Sheridan is getting through high school by lying low, listening to the Smiths (it's 1986), reading Alan Moore's Watchmen comics, never raising his hand in class, and avoiding the kids he grew up with. Then new girl Eleanor gets on the bus. Tall, with bright red hair and a dress code all her own, she's an instant target. Too nice not to let her sit next to him, Park is alternately resentful and guilty for not being kinder to her. When he realizes she's reading his comics over his shoulder, a silent friendship is born. And slowly, tantalizingly, something more. Adult author Rowell (Attachments), making her YA debut, has a gift for showing what Eleanor and Park, who tell the story in alternating segments, like and admire about each other. Their love is believable and thrilling, but it isn't simple: Eleanor's family is broke, and her stepfather abuses her mother. When the situation turns dangerous, Rowell keeps things surprising, and the solution—imperfect but believable—maintains the novel's delicate balance of light and dark. Ages 13–up. Agent: Christopher Schelling, Selectric Artists. (Mar.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC