What you are getting wrong about Appalachia / Elizabeth Catte.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: An insider's perspective on Appalachia, and a frank, ferocious assessment of America's recent fascination with the people and the problems of the region.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: "In 2016 headlines declared Appalachia ground zero for America's "forgotten tribe" of white working-class voters. Following the presidential election, demystifying Appalachia and locating the roots of its dysfunction quickly seemed to become a national industry, shoring up the success of J.D. Vance's memoir Hillbilly Elegy and the author's rise to fame as the media's favorite working-class whisperer. With 'What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, ' Elizabeth Catte offers a much-needed perspective on Appalachia, and a frank, ferocious assessment of America's recent fascination with the people and problems of the region summed up in shorthand as 'Trump Country'"--Back cover.
    • Content Notes:
      Appalachia and the Making of Trump Country -- Hillbilly Elegy and the Racial Baggage of J.D. Vance's "Greater Appalachia" -- Land, Justice, People.
    • Notes:
      Includes bibliographical references (pages 135-142).
    • Other Titles:
      What you're getting wrong about Appalachia.
    • ISBN:
      9780998904146
      0998904147
    • Accession Number:
      2017470625
    • Accession Number:
      ocn994637519
      994637519
    • Accession Number:
      fay.680834
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      CATTE, E. What you are getting wrong about Appalachia. First edition. [s. l.]: Belt Publishing, 2018. ISBN 9780998904146. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.680834. Acesso em: 6 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Catte E. What You Are Getting Wrong about Appalachia. First edition. Belt Publishing; 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.680834. Accessed July 6, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      Catte E. What You Are Getting Wrong about Appalachia. First edition. Belt Publishing; 2018. Accessed July 6, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.680834
    • APA:
      Catte, E. (2018). What you are getting wrong about Appalachia (First edition.). Belt Publishing.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Catte, Elizabeth. 2018. What You Are Getting Wrong about Appalachia. First edition. Belt Publishing. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.680834.
    • Harvard:
      Catte, E. (2018) What you are getting wrong about Appalachia. First edition. Belt Publishing. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.680834 (Accessed: 6 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Catte, E 2018, What you are getting wrong about Appalachia, First edition., Belt Publishing, viewed 6 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Catte, Elizabeth. What You Are Getting Wrong about Appalachia. First edition., Belt Publishing, 2018. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.680834.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Catte, Elizabeth. What You Are Getting Wrong about Appalachia. First edition. Belt Publishing, 2018. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.680834.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Catte E. What you are getting wrong about Appalachia [Internet]. First edition. Belt Publishing; 2018 [cited 2020 Jul 6]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.680834

Reviews

PW Reviews 2017 October #4

Catte, a historian from East Tennessee, presents a thoughtful insider's perspective on Appalachia to counteract the stereotypes associated with the region. She believes that Appalachia—a region of 25 million people encompassing 700,000 square miles across 13 states—is too often presented as a monolithic, dysfunctional "other America" or "white ghetto." Catte's Appalachia is instead a "battleground, where industry barons, social reformers, and workers" wage an intergenerational class war. She offers a brief but nuanced history of the region that covers the post–Civil War arrival of industry, the early- 20th-century labor uprisings against exploitative coal companies, government intervention during the 1960s War on Poverty, and the oversize role played in Appalachia's economy by the current "prison-industrial complex." Catte also effectively refutes what she refers to as Hillbilly Elegy author J.D. Vance's "myth"—that white Appalachians share a distinct, homogenous Scots-Irish heritage, rather than a fusion of various European ethnic groups. To highlight the region's diversity, she observes that for the past three decades African-Americans and Hispanics have contributed most to the area's population growth and that West Virginia, the only entirely Appalachian state, has the nation's highest concentration of transgender teens. Though this work could have been more tightly edited, it succeeds in providing a richer, more complex view of a much-maligned region. (Feb.)

Copyright 2017 Publishers Weekly.