The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian / by Sherman Alexie ; art by Ellen Forney.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st ed.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.
    • Content Notes:
      The black eye of the month club -- Why chicken means so much to me -- Revenge is my middle name -- Because geometry is not a country somewhere near France -- Hope against hope -- Go means go -- Rowdy sings the blues -- How to fight monsters -- Grandmother gives me some advice -- Tears of a clown -- Halloween -- Slouching toward Thanksgiving -- My sister sends me an E-mail -- Thanksgiving -- Hunger pains -- Rowdy gives me advice about love -- Dance, dance, dance -- Don't trust your computer -- My sister sends me a letter -- Reindeer games -- And a partridge in a pear tree -- Red versus white -- Wake -- Valentine heart -- In like a lion -- Rowdy and I have a long and serious discussion about basketball -- Because Russian guys are not always geniuses -- My final freshman year report card -- Remembering -- Talking about turtles -- Discussion guide -- Interview with Ellen Forney.
    • Notes:
      Ellen Forney.
    • Notes:
      600L Lexile.
      Accelerated Reader Grades 9-12 4 6 SD Quiz 117771 English fiction.
      Boston-Globe-Horn Book Award, 2008
      A Junior Library Guild selection.
      National Book Award, Young People's Literature, 2007.
      Odyssey Award, 2009.
      Notable Book for a Global Society award winner, 2008.
      American Indian Youth Literature Award Winner, 2008
    • ISBN:
      9780316013680
      0316013684
      9781428764507
      142876450X
      9780316013697
      0316013692
      9780316068208
      0316068209
    • Accession Number:
      2007022799
    • Accession Number:
      ocn154698238
      154698238
    • Accession Number:
      fay.699833
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      ALEXIE, S.; FORNEY, E. The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian. 1st ed. [s. l.]: Little, Brown, 2007. ISBN 9780316013680. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.699833. Acesso em: 23 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Alexie S, Forney E. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. 1st ed. Little, Brown; 2007. Accessed November 23, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.699833
    • APA:
      Alexie, S., & Forney, E. (2007). The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian (1st ed.). Little, Brown.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Alexie, Sherman, and Ellen Forney. 2007. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. 1st ed. Tayshas High School Reading List, 2008-2009. Little, Brown. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.699833.
    • Harvard:
      Alexie, S. and Forney, E. (2007) The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian. 1st ed. Little, Brown (Tayshas high school reading list, 2008-2009). Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.699833 (Accessed: 23 November 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Alexie, S & Forney, E 2007, The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian, 1st ed., Tayshas high school reading list, 2008-2009, Little, Brown, viewed 23 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Alexie, Sherman, and Ellen Forney. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. 1st ed., Little, Brown, 2007. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.699833.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Alexie, Sherman, and Ellen Forney. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. 1st ed. Tayshas High School Reading List, 2008-2009. Little, Brown, 2007. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.699833.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Alexie S, Forney E. The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian [Internet]. 1st ed. Little, Brown; 2007 [cited 2020 Nov 23]. (Tayshas high school reading list, 2008-2009). Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.699833

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2007 August #1

Arnold Spirit, a goofy-looking dork with a decent jumpshot, spends his time lamenting life on the "poor-ass" Spokane Indian reservation, drawing cartoons (which accompany, and often provide more insight than, the narrative), and, along with his aptly named pal Rowdy, laughing those laughs over anything and nothing that affix best friends so intricately together. When a teacher pleads with Arnold to want more, to escape the hopelessness of the rez, Arnold switches to a rich white school and immediately becomes as much an outcast in his own community as he is a curiosity in his new one. He weathers the typical teenage indignations and triumphs like a champ but soon faces far more trying ordeals as his home life begins to crumble and decay amidst the suffocating mire of alcoholism on the reservation. Alexie's humor and prose are easygoing and well suited to his young audience, and he doesn't pull many punches as he levels his eye at stereotypes both warranted and inapt. A few of the plotlines fade to gray by the end, but this ultimately affirms the incredible power of best friends to hurt and heal in equal measure. Younger teens looking for the strength to lift themselves out of rough situations would do well to start here. Copyright 2007 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2007 #5

The line between dramatic monologue, verse novel, and standup comedy gets unequivocally -- and hilariously and triumphantly -- bent in this novel about coming of age on the rez. Urged on by a math teacher whose nose he has just broken, Junior, fourteen, decides to make the iffy commute from his Spokane Indian reservation to attend high school in Reardan, a small town twenty miles away. He's tired of his impoverished circumstances ("Adam and Eve covered their privates with fig leaves; the first Indians covered their privates with their tiny hands"), but while he hopes his new school will offer him a better education, he knows the odds aren't exactly with him: "What was I doing at Reardan, whose mascot was an Indian, thereby making me the only other Indian in town?" But he makes friends (most notably the class dork Gordy), gets a girlfriend, and even (though short, nearsighted, and slightly disabled from birth defects) lands a spot on the varsity basketball team, which inevitably leads to a showdown with his own home team, led by his former best friend Rowdy. Junior's narration is intensely alive and rat-a-tat-tat with short paragraphs and one-liners ("If God hadn't wanted us to masturbate, then God wouldn't have given us thumbs"). The dominant mode of the novel is comic, even though there's plenty of sadness, as when Junior's sister manages to shake off depression long enough to elope -- only to die, passed out from drinking, in a fire. Junior's spirit, though, is unquenchable, and his style inimitable, not least in the take-no-prisoners cartoons he draws (as expertly depicted by comics artist Forney) from his bicultural experience. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

PW Reviews 2007 August #3

Screenwriter, novelist and poet, Alexie bounds into YA with what might be a Native American equivalent of Angela's Ashes, a coming-of-age story so well observed that its very rootedness in one specific culture is also what lends it universality, and so emotionally honest that the humor almost always proves painful. Presented as the diary of hydrocephalic 14-year-old cartoonist and Spokane Indian Arnold Spirit Jr., the novel revolves around Junior's desperate hope of escaping the reservation. As he says of his drawings, "I think the world is a series of broken dams and floods, and my cartoons are tiny little lifeboats." He transfers to a public school 22 miles away in a rich farm town where the only other Indian is the team mascot. Although his parents support his decision, everyone else on the rez sees him as a traitor, an apple ("red on the outside and white on the inside"), while at school most teachers and students project stereotypes onto him: "I was half Indian in one place and half white in the other." Readers begin to understand Junior's determination as, over the course of the school year, alcoholism and self-destructive behaviors lead to the deaths of close relatives. Unlike protagonists in many YA novels who reclaim or retain ethnic ties in order to find their true selves, Junior must separate from his tribe in order to preserve his identity. Jazzy syntax and Forney's witty cartoons examining Indian versus White attire and behavior transmute despair into dark humor; Alexie's no-holds-barred jokes have the effect of throwing the seriousness of his themes into high relief. Ages 14-up. (Sept.)

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