A girl, a raccoon, and the midnight moon / by Karen Romano Young ; illustrated by Jessixa Bagley.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      Summary: Eleven-year-old Pearl Moran cannot imagine life without the historic but under-utilized branch of the New York Public Library where she was born (in the Memorial Room) and where her single mother works as the circulation librarian; the other librarians, the neighborhood people, the raccoons, and most of the 41,000 plus books all form the structure and essence of her life--but when someone cuts off the head of the library's statue of Edna St. Vincent Millay she realizes that the library is under attack, and it is up to her to save it.
    • ISBN:
      9781452169521
      1452169527
    • Accession Number:
      2018041272
    • Accession Number:
      on1052904642
      1052904642
    • Accession Number:
      fay.701680
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      YOUNG, K. R.; BAGLEY, J. A girl, a raccoon, and the midnight moon. [s. l.]: Chronicle Books, 2019. ISBN 9781452169521. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.701680. Acesso em: 21 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Young KR, Bagley J. A Girl, a Raccoon, and the Midnight Moon. Chronicle Books; 2019. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.701680
    • APA:
      Young, K. R., & Bagley, J. (2019). A girl, a raccoon, and the midnight moon. Chronicle Books.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Young, Karen Romano, and Jessixa Bagley. 2019. A Girl, a Raccoon, and the Midnight Moon. Chronicle Books. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.701680.
    • Harvard:
      Young, K. R. and Bagley, J. (2019) A girl, a raccoon, and the midnight moon. Chronicle Books. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.701680 (Accessed: 21 September 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Young, KR & Bagley, J 2019, A girl, a raccoon, and the midnight moon, Chronicle Books, viewed 21 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Young, Karen Romano, and Jessixa Bagley. A Girl, a Raccoon, and the Midnight Moon. Chronicle Books, 2019. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.701680.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Young, Karen Romano, and Jessixa Bagley. A Girl, a Raccoon, and the Midnight Moon. Chronicle Books, 2019. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.701680.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Young KR, Bagley J. A girl, a raccoon, and the midnight moon [Internet]. Chronicle Books; 2019 [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat05595a&AN=fay.701680

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2020 January #1

Kicking off this literary whodunit is a piercing scream, which can be traced to 10-year-old Pearl upon her discovery that the library's beloved Edna St. Vincent Millay statue is missing its head. This act of vandalism serves as the catalyst for a number of events that subsequently transpire in Pearl's New York City neighborhood. The local library, of which her mother is the head librarian, is struggling and in very real danger of being converted into apartments. Pearl refuses to let this happen and endeavors to track down the vandal and drum up community support for the library. Young incorporates a number of realistic themes into her story, ranging from the challenges of making friends and accepting change to gentrification and homelessness. However there is also a fantasy element that not every reader will buy: literate raccoons. Those willing to suspend their disbelief will be charmed by the reading raccoons and the many sidebars that one contributes to the book itself. Issue- rather than plot-driven, this slower-paced mystery is for the thoughtful and bookish. Grades 4-8. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Booklist Reviews 2020 January #1

Kicking off this literary whodunit is a piercing scream, which can be traced to 10-year-old Pearl upon her discovery that the library's beloved Edna St. Vincent Millay statue is missing its head. This act of vandalism serves as the catalyst for a number of events that subsequently transpire in Pearl's New York City neighborhood. The local library, of which her mother is the head librarian, is struggling and in very real danger of being converted into apartments. Pearl refuses to let this happen and endeavors to track down the vandal and drum up community support for the library. Young incorporates a number of realistic themes into her story, ranging from the challenges of making friends and accepting change to gentrification and homelessness. However there is also a fantasy element that not every reader will buy: literate raccoons. Those willing to suspend their disbelief will be charmed by the reading raccoons and the many sidebars that one contributes to the book itself. Issue- rather than plot-driven, this slower-paced mystery is for the thoughtful and bookish. Grades 4-8. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2020 #1

Pearl was born at the Lancaster Avenue branch of the (fictional) New York City Library, and as the circulation librarian’s daughter, she has felt at home there for more than a decade. But the library building is neglected and in disrepair, and developers want to repurpose it for housing. When Pearl discovers the library’s beloved statue of Edna St. Vincent Millay is missing its head, she leads a search for it while organizing neighborhood enthusiasm for both “Vincent” and the library. In a surprise fantastical twist, she discovers that the raccoons living in the library’s basement are book lovers, skilled journalists, and some of her most valuable allies in the fight to save her home. The richly developed cast of charactersâ€"library manager Bruce, Pearl’s classmate Francine, journalist Jonathan Yoiksâ€"supports a solid and fast-moving plot with an entertaining narrative reveal. Bagley’s illustrations bring Pearl’s world to life, and the explanatory sidebars that appear throughout the book (“A Sidebar About Exclamation Points”; “A Sidebar About Homelessness”) are informative as well as plot-shaping. Pearl’s growth over the course of the story is satisfying, and the book effectively delivers its multiple messages without overwhelming readers. Sarah Rettger January/February 2020 p.99 Copyright 2020 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

PW Reviews 2019 October #2

Born in the Lancaster Avenue branch of the New York City Public Library to a circulation librarian, 10-year-old Pearl is well-known to its staff, and loves books, her neighborhood, and the library's garden statue of Edna St. Vincent Millay. When the statue's head disappears, Pearl's scream brings the entire neighborhood running. The head's theft makes the paper and draws developers to the underresourced library, which needs repairs that the city refuses to finance. As the library loses importance as a "neighborhood hub," Pearl and her mother aim to save it. Neighbors and library regulars rally to help, as does Francine, the neighborhood new girl who slowly shows Pearl the power of friendship. But it's the raccoons living in the basement, who publish a newspaper and ally with Pearl, who help her in her quest. Part mystery, part coming-of-age journey, Young's (Hundred Percent) story interweaves realistically flawed, fully formed characters with real-world issues (declining library attendance and homelessness) and fantastical elements. Sidebars ("A Sidebar About Legends") penned by a mysterious author and signature illustrations by Bagley offer charming details. Ages 10–14. Author's agent: Faye Bender, the Book Group. Illustrator's agent: Alexandra Penfold, Upstart Crow Literary. (Jan.)

Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.