Like nothing amazing ever happened / Emily Blejwas.

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      First edition.
    • Abstract:
      Summary: "In small-town Wicapi, Minnesota, in 1991, twelve-year-old Justin struggles to pick up the pieces of his life after the unexpected death of his father." -- (Source of summary not specified)
    • ISBN:
      9781984848482
      1984848488
      9781984848499
      1984848496
    • Accession Number:
      2018060961
    • Accession Number:
      on1081366378
      1081366378
    • Accession Number:
      fay.718828

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2020 March #1

It's been six weeks since Justin's dad, a war vet with PTSD, came home and got himself killed on the trolley tracks. Things are different now for the 12-year-old, his older brother (Murphy), and their mom. Both Mom and Murphy are working extra, leaving Justin to come home to an empty house. Will normalcy return? Justin ponders what normal even means now, but he's thankful that Phuc remains his loyal friend and that Jenni seems to likes him. Picking up the pieces of his life is hard, especially when many of Justin's questions don't have answers. Blejwas (Once You Know This, 2017) has equipped her sophomore novel with realistic main characters who experience varying emotional upheavals. Her small-town setting—Wicapi, Minnesota—is so frigid in February that readers will feel it, and it's filled with nosy but caring folks. As the plot develops, Justin, Murphy, and Mom settle into a new routine, still with sadness but also punctuated with joy and laughter. A quiet look at death, loss, and recovery. Grades 4-7. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2020 Spring

Seventh grader Justin struggles to cope with the ambiguous circumstances surrounding his Vietnam War veteran father's death and ultimately the unknowability of his intentions. Relying on a small circle of support, including his older brother, his best friend, his bus driver, and a local homeless man, Justin slowly comes to terms with his grief and begins to move toward healing. Chapters are a collection of unconnected but chronologically unfolding scenes, most of which bring the reader directly into the events without preamble. This deliberately disconcerting style conveys a perpetual and profound disequilibrium that mimics the protagonist's inability to cope with his daily life, school, friendships, and family while he grieves internally. Deeper themes of war, conflict, and religion, with quantum physics and local small-town Minnesota history factoring in, add depth to Justin's journey. Copyright 2021 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2020 #3

Seventh grader Justin struggles to cope with the ambiguous circumstances surrounding his Vietnam War veteran father's death and ultimately the unknowability of his intentions. Relying on a small circle of support, including his older brother, his best friend, his bus driver, and a local homeless man, Justin slowly comes to terms with his grief and begins to move toward healing. Chapters are a collection of unconnected but chronologically unfolding scenes, most of which bring the reader directly into the events without preamble. This deliberately disconcerting style conveys a perpetual and profound disequilibrium that mimics the protagonist's inability to cope with his daily life, school, friendships, and family while he grieves internally. Deeper themes of war, conflict, and religion, with quantum physics and local small-town Minnesota history factoring in, add depth to Justin's journey. Eric Carpenter May/June 2020 p.119 Copyright 2020 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.