Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise

Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Walker Community Room

Please join us on Sunday, February 26th at 2:00pm as we host AETN to screen a portion of the documentary series, Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise, written, produced and hosted by Harvard Professor, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. In this series, Gates embarks on a deeply personal journey through the last 50 years of African-American history. Joined by leading scholars, celebrities and a dynamic cast of people who shaped these years, Gates travels from the victories of the civil rights movemnt up to today. How did we end up here, when half a century ago racial equality seemed imminent,even inevitable? Gates offers a fresh examination of key events and turning points in American race relations and black history, animated by viewpoints that have rarely been heard on television, ideas that are not often said out loud and questions that many are afraid to ask. Painting a uniquely complex, comprehensive, and integrated portrait of black America since 1965, the film reveals how much further African Americans have come in the past fifty years than many think, while simultaneously having much farther to go than anyone expected. 

 A panel discussion featuring: Caree A. Banton, John L. Colbert, Raven Cook, Pearl K. Dowe and Angela M. Monts will follow the screening offering their insights and opinions and welcoming questions and comments from the audience. 

The program is free and open to the public.

2017-02-26 20:00:00 2017-02-26 22:00:00 America/Edmonton Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise Please join us on Sunday, February 26th at 2:00pm as we host AETN to screen a portion of the documentary series, Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise, written, produced and hosted by Harvard Professor, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. In this series, Gates embarks on a deeply personal journey through the last 50 years of African-American history. Joined by leading scholars, celebrities and a dynamic cast of people who shaped these years, Gates travels from the victories of the civil rights movemnt up to today. How did we end up here, when half a century ago racial equality seemed imminent,even inevitable? Gates offers a fresh examination of key events and turning points in American race relations and black history, animated by viewpoints that have rarely been heard on television, ideas that are not often said out loud and questions that many are afraid to ask. Painting a uniquely complex, comprehensive, and integrated portrait of black America since 1965, the film reveals how much further African Americans have come in the past fifty years than many think, while simultaneously having much farther to go than anyone expected.   A panel discussion featuring: Caree A. Banton, John L. Colbert, Raven Cook, Pearl K. Dowe and Angela M. Monts will follow the screening offering their insights and opinions and welcoming questions and comments from the audience.  The program is free and open to the public. Walker Community Room Fayetteville Public Library